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I have a struct that is defined to hold a header as part of a binary data file. I use it to do one read then use its information. Afterwards I want to use it to do another read. Do I need to free it or anything before I can use it again?

I'm getting some memory errors and I think this might be the issue.. Im including the code but it's rough and is the current result of my attempts at debugging this problem.

void readSlices (struct header fileHead, unsigned long *offsets, FILE *fp, struct car **hashTable, int *tableSize){
    struct TVehicle3D tempVehicle;
    struct BlockHeaderData blockHead;
    struct vertexNode *ptr;
    int sliceNum = 1;
    int i;

    while (sliceNum <= fileHead.slicesStored) {
        fseek (fp, offsets[sliceNum], SEEK_SET);
        fread(&(blockHead),sizeof(blockHead), 1, fp);
        printf ("Type: %d  Size: %d\n", blockHead.objectType,blockHead.size );
        while (blockHead.objectType != 88) {
            if (blockHead.objectType == 86) {
                printf ("Reading slice\n");
                fread(&(tempVehicle),75, 1, fp);

                if (*tableSize < tempVehicle.id) {
                    (*tableSize)++;
                    printf ("increasing tablesize (realloc)\n");
                    *hashTable = realloc(*hashTable, (*tableSize) * sizeof (struct car*));
                };
                if ((*hashTable)[tempVehicle.id].set == 0) {
                    (*hashTable)[tempVehicle.id].set = 1;
                };
                (*hashTable)[tempVehicle.id].sliceOut = sliceNum;
                //printf ("size of table at slice #%d = %d\n",tempVehicle.id, *tableSize);
                tempVehicle.centroid.x = ((tempVehicle.points[0].x)+(tempVehicle.points[1].x)+(tempVehicle.points[2].x)+(tempVehicle.points[3].x))/4;
                tempVehicle.centroid.y = ((tempVehicle.points[0].y)+(tempVehicle.points[1].y)+(tempVehicle.points[2].y)+(tempVehicle.points[3].y))/4;
                tempVehicle.centroid.z = ((tempVehicle.points[0].z)+(tempVehicle.points[1].z)+(tempVehicle.points[2].z)+(tempVehicle.points[3].z))/4;
                ptr = (*hashTable)[tempVehicle.id].node;
                printf ("Set ptr\n");
                for (i = 0; i < sliceNum - (*hashTable)[tempVehicle.id].sliceIn; i++) {
                printf ("Setting loop\n");
                    ptr = (*ptr).node;
                };
                printf ("Setting ptr xyz\n");
                ptr = malloc (sizeof (struct vertexNode));
                ptr->x = tempVehicle.centroid.x;
                (ptr)->y = tempVehicle.centroid.y;
                (ptr)->z = tempVehicle.centroid.z;
                if (tempVehicle.id==1) printf ("centroid x: %d y: %d z: %d\n", tempVehicle.centroid.x, tempVehicle.centroid.y, tempVehicle.centroid.z);
            }
            else fseek (fp, ftell(fp) + blockHead.size, SEEK_SET);
            fread(&(blockHead),sizeof(blockHead), 1, fp);
            //printf ("Type: %d  Size: %d\n", blockHead.objectType,blockHead.size );
        };
        sliceNum++;
    };
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are free to re-use a buffer as often as you like.

Looking at your code, I see that you ptr = malloc(...); but you never free(ptr); in the code you've pasted. This will cause a memory leak. Your malloc() is inside your loop, making for a potentially very significant leak.

Edit: on a fast look, it's not clear why you're calling malloc() at all here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, with valgrind I'm getting Invalid read of size.. several times within the loop.. It works with and without the malloc –  RyanS Apr 16 '12 at 18:12
    
You need to be more specific when you report these things (what line? Invalid read of size what?), but I posted another answer below with the (almost certain) cause... –  goldilocks Apr 16 '12 at 18:42

Look here:

  if (*tableSize < tempVehicle.id) {
                (*tableSize)++;
                printf ("increasing tablesize (realloc)\n");
                *hashTable = realloc(*hashTable, (*tableSize) * sizeof (struct car*));
            };
            if ((*hashTable)[tempVehicle.id].set == 0) {
                (*hashTable)[tempVehicle.id].set = 1;
            };

Let's say tablesize is 10, and tempVehicle.id is 11, so you increment tablesize to 11 and realloc hashTable to be an array of 11 struct pointers.

Then you try to access and assign to hashTable[11] -- the 12th element -- repeatedly. That would explain your "Invalid reads", and nb., do some out of bounds writing.

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Re-using 'filehead', in and of itself, will not cause the error. It's impossible to know exactly what is causing the error without more details from the rest of the program, but here are a few lines that are suspect:

fread(&(tempVehicle),75, 1, fp);

Is sizeof(tempVehicle) at least 75 bytes?

tempVehicle and blockHead are allocated on the stack and if very large could cause stack overflows.

How is *offsets allocated? Is it guaranteed to be of size at least fileHead.slicesStored?

share|improve this answer
    
tempVehicle is at least 75 but I no longer need to have it like that so I replaced it with sizeof. Also it is guaranteed to be that big. My program doesnt run long enough to fill the stack. I'm getting errors around the realloc.. –  RyanS Apr 16 '12 at 18:28

on a fast look, it's not clear why you're calling malloc() at all here.

I'd guess it's because RyanS is trying to save on declarations; "ptr" is used in the loop for several different purposes (the only commonality being, they all involve a struct vertexNode).

That's not a good practice. It's not clear what the malloc'd ptr is for, since it is assigned to then thrown away, but if you just need a buffer for use inside the loop, use a local struct vertexNode like you use a local struct TVehicle3D, separate from ptr.

Pay attention to mah's point about the leak. That is a very serious issue. Also: this is an unconventional looking statement:

ptr = (*ptr).node; 

Just use ptr = ptr->node.

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