Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have these template aliases:

enum class enabler {};

template <typename T>
using EnableIf = typename std::enable_if<T::value, enabler>::type;
template <typename T>
using DisableIf = typename std::enable_if<!T::value, enabler>::type;

I can do the following in GCC:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T, EnableIf<std::is_polymorphic<T>> = {}>
void f(T) { std::cout << "is polymorphic\n"; }

template <typename T, DisableIf<std::is_polymorphic<T>> = {}>
void f(T) { std::cout << "is not polymorphic\n"; }

struct foo { virtual void g() {} };

int main() {
    f(foo {});
    f(int {});
}

It prints:

is polymorphic
is not polymorphic

Which matches my expectations.

With clang that code does not compile. It produces the following error messages.

test.cpp:11:58: error: expected expression
template <typename T, EnableIf<std::is_polymorphic<T>> = {}>
                                                         ^
test.cpp:14:59: error: expected expression
template <typename T, DisableIf<std::is_polymorphic<T>> = {}>
                                                          ^
test.cpp:20:3: error: no matching function for call to 'f'
  f(foo {});
  ^
test.cpp:12:6: note: candidate template ignored: couldn't infer template argument ''
void f(T) { std::cout << "is polymorphic\n"; }
     ^
test.cpp:15:6: note: candidate template ignored: couldn't infer template argument ''
void f(T) { std::cout << "is not polymorphic\n"; }
     ^
test.cpp:21:3: error: no matching function for call to 'f'
  f(int {});
  ^
test.cpp:12:6: note: candidate template ignored: couldn't infer template argument ''
void f(T) { std::cout << "is polymorphic\n"; }
     ^
test.cpp:15:6: note: candidate template ignored: couldn't infer template argument ''
void f(T) { std::cout << "is not polymorphic\n"; }
     ^
4 errors generated.

Should it compile? Which of the two compilers is faulty?

share|improve this question
    
Ooops, I feel silly. I have a feeling this has nothing to do with template aliases, so the title is possibly misleading :S Sorry about that, I'll investigate a bit and fix the title if that turns out the case. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 16 '12 at 19:48
2  
DisableIf<std::is_polymorphic<T>> = {} is that legal initializer list initialization? Can structures be template value parameters? –  jpalecek Apr 16 '12 at 19:49
    
@jpalecek No, structures can't. That's why I use an enum :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 16 '12 at 19:51
    
Clang issues similar error messages if I don't use the aliases and just manually "inline" them, so I fixed the title. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 16 '12 at 19:55
1  
@jpalecek That's for the enum's name. It refers to the fact that enum {} is valid, but enum class {} isn't. Not at all relevant here. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 16 '12 at 22:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First and foremost, thanks to @Richard Smith on the #llvm IRC Channel on oftc for the explanation.
Unfortunately, this is not legal C++ and as such Clang is correct: {} is not an expression but a braced-init-list and as such will never be a constant expression as is needed in the initializer of a non-type template parameter.

§14.3.2 [temp.arg.non-type] p1

A template-argument for a non-type, non-template template-parameter shall be one of:

  • for a non-type template-parameter of integral or enumeration type, a converted constant expression (5.19) of the type of the template-parameter; or
  • [...]

One solution would be a dummy value in enabler.

share|improve this answer
2  
That is not a good argument - we are not talking about template arguments here (noone tries eg. f<int,{}>), but default arguments, which have a syntax of a parameter-declaration, which can, in principle, have {} on the rhs (and if enabler{} is a constant expression, or x, given enabler x{}, there shouldn't be a problem with constant). However, 8.3.6/3 says there should be an expression in case of template parameter declaration. –  jpalecek Apr 16 '12 at 22:40
    
@jpalecek: "oone tries eg. f<int,{}>" Uh, calling f<int> does exactly that. –  GManNickG Apr 16 '12 at 23:52
1  
@GManNickG: No, it doesn't. Default parameters are not specified (at least explicitly) as text substitutions. –  jpalecek Apr 18 '12 at 15:35
    
@jpalecek: In what way does a default argument differ from a formal argument? In any case you can't just use {} because it can never be a constant expression, which is what's needed to initialize a non-type parameter. –  Xeo Apr 18 '12 at 15:55
1  
@jpalecek Is paragraph 9 of 14.1 Template Parameters "A default template-argument is a template-argument (14.3) specified after = in a template-parameter." the missing argument in this case? –  Luc Danton Apr 22 '12 at 4:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.