Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

i did a lot of search on the internet but could not get a satisfacting solution. The best I did was:

String b = new BigDecimal(floatNumber.stripTrailingZeros().toPlainString();

But it hast some nasty bugs, e.g. if the number is 1.6 i get 1.600000744 (or similar).


share|improve this question
Are you really saying that 1.6 becomes 16, or is that just a typo? – Tim Apr 16 '12 at 20:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you're seeing is really not a bug, it's just a result of using floating point numbers with limited precision. It can't accurately represent 1.6.

If you want the print to cut off digits past a certain point, you can do so with the DecimalFormat as previously mentioned:

String result = new DecimalFormat("#.##").format(floatNumber).toString()

This will print two decimal places, add as many #'s as you want after the decimal to be cut off. But what you're seeing is technically the correct value of floatNumber, even if you don't want that much precision.

share|improve this answer
if i print out float 1.6 it looked correct. I have numbers with not more than 2 digits after the . like 2.55, some with one like 1.6 and most are without decimal places. how do i get them to look nice? i dont want to have 1.00's – user1324936 Apr 17 '12 at 19:07
Read the DecimalFormat documentation, it will have your answer: – Tim Apr 17 '12 at 19:11
that is too much text – user1324936 Apr 18 '12 at 21:46

Try this,

DecimalFormat twoDecForm = new DecimalFormat("#.##");

String b = twoDecForm.format(Double.parseDouble(Float.toString(floatNumber)));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.