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I have a BufferedReader, when I try to read it, it just hangs and doesn't do anything, am I doing this right? I am using this in an AsyncTask.

  • Edit: I have a tablet connected to the Wi-Fi, this connects to my computer which is broadcasting on 172.20.104.203 on port 5334, I can see when the thread starts, but nothing after that.

Here my code:

try {
       final BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(
       new InputStreamReader(socket.getInputStream()));       
       String line = null;
       while ((line = in.readLine()) != null) {
          final String msg;
          msg = (line);
          Log.d("DeviceActivity", msg);
       }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        Log.e("ClientAcivtity: Exception",
        String.valueOf(e));
    }
  • EDIT I have all the right permissions or anything, I was doing this outside a AsyncTask and it worked perfectly, moved it because I didn't want it in the main thread.

-Edit , here is the full code.

public class NetworkTask extends AsyncTask<Void, byte[], Boolean> {
        Socket nsocket; // Network Socket
        InputStream nis; // Network Input Stream
        OutputStream nos; // Network Output Stream
        private Handler handler = new Handler();

        Boolean connected = false;

        public static final int PORT = 5334;
        public String SERVERIP = "172.20.104.203";

        Socket socket;

        @Override
        protected void onPreExecute() {
            Log.i("AsyncTask", "onPreExecute");
            InetAddress serverAddr;
            try {
                serverAddr = InetAddress.getByName(SERVERIP);
                socket = new Socket(serverAddr, PORT);
                connected = true;
            } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
                Log.e("ClientAcivtity: Exception", String.valueOf(e));
            } catch (IOException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
                Log.e("ClientAcivtity: Exception", String.valueOf(e));
            }
        }

        @Override
        protected Boolean doInBackground(Void... params) { // This runs on a
                                                            // different thread
            boolean result = false;

            try {

                Log.d("ClientActivity", "C: Connecting...");
                if (socket != null) {
                    int cont = 1;
                    while (cont == 1) {
                        try {
                            Log.d("ClientActivity", "C: Sending command.");
                            PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(
                                    new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(
                                            socket.getOutputStream())), true);
                            // where you issue the commands
                            out.println("getPos");
                            Log.d("ClientActivity", "C: Sent " + "getPos");

                        } catch (Exception e) {
                            Log.e("ClientAcivtity: Exception",
                                    String.valueOf(e));
                        }
                        try {
                            final BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(
                                    new InputStreamReader(
                                            socket.getInputStream()));
                            String line = null;
                            while ((line = in.readLine()) != null) {
                                final String msg;
                                msg = (line);
                                Log.d("DeviceActivity", msg);
                            }
                        } catch (Exception e) {
                            e.printStackTrace();
                            Log.e("ClientAcivtity: Exception",
                                    String.valueOf(e));
                        }
                        cont--;
                    }

                    Log.d("ClientActivity", "C: Closed.");
                }
            } catch (Exception e) {
                Log.e("ClientAcivtity: Exception", String.valueOf(e));
            }

            return result;
        }

        @Override
        protected void onProgressUpdate(byte[]... values) {
            if (values.length > 0) {
                Log.i("AsyncTask", "onProgressUpdate: " + values[0].length
                        + " bytes received.");
            }
        }

        @Override
        protected void onCancelled() {
            Log.i("AsyncTask", "Cancelled.");
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(Boolean result) {
            if (socket != null) {
                if (connected) {
                    if (result) {
                        Log.i("AsyncTask",
                                "onPostExecute: Completed with an Error.");
                        try {
                            socket.close();
                        } catch (IOException e) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    } else {
                        Log.i("AsyncTask", "onPostExecute: Completed.");
                        try {
                            socket.close();
                        } catch (IOException e) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
what's on the other side? the problem with readline is that until the socket is disconnected or a new line sent it will not return... –  MByD Apr 16 '12 at 20:39
    
Do you want my full code? –  FabianCook Apr 16 '12 at 20:40
    
Not full code, just the essence of the communication. –  MByD Apr 16 '12 at 20:41
    
using in.readLine() is not a good idea –  waqaslam Apr 16 '12 at 20:41
    
What would be better? –  FabianCook Apr 16 '12 at 20:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My guess is that when you write out the command "getPos" the underlying BufferedWriter is not actually sending the data out on the line (you should verify this with tcpdump/wireshark). If this is the case, the server doesn't responsed to the readLine(), since it never got a command. To verify this claim, add out.flush(); after out.println("getPos");

Really, tcpdump will probably give you a better answer then anyone on the forums.

Also see http://developer.android.com/reference/java/io/BufferedWriter.html

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I found out what the problem was, it was a silly mistake but your answer helped me realise, I was looking at yours and noticed it didn't have the $ in front of getPos, the device that I am connected to on the computer site needs that before a command, silly silly me, thanks –  FabianCook Apr 16 '12 at 22:58

Try doing it like this:

final BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                                                    socket.getInputStream()));
StringBuffer buf = new StringBuffer();
int i;
while((i = in.read()) != -1){
    buf.append((char) i);
}

String data = buf.toString();
share|improve this answer
    
It doesnt seem to be working sorry but thanks –  FabianCook Apr 16 '12 at 21:02
    
then i guess you should create a thread which should continuously listen for data in stream –  waqaslam Apr 16 '12 at 21:06
    
I only want to listen once, after I sent that message, the reply should be right away. –  FabianCook Apr 16 '12 at 21:12
    
then put some delay because you never know when the message arrives –  waqaslam Apr 16 '12 at 21:19

Reading from sockets is a quite difficult issue depending where the socket is actually connected to and how the other side responds.

If the other side is extremely fast than it can provide the socket with enough data so that the read routines actually work fine. However if there is a delay in the other side of any kind (just needs to be slower than your read routine incl the small default timeout) then your read fails even though there might be data on the other side - just arriving a little too slow at the socket.

Depending on your needs you may wrap your own minimum and maximum timer around the read routine.

Please provide more information and we can better understand the issue.

In many cases it is necessary to have a minimum timeout large enough for the other side to push data to the socket - but you might also need a maximum time for how long you actually want to wait for data to arrive.

UPDATE:

first the runnable to start the monitoring thread. You may use monitoringCanRun in your loop to interrupt the thread if required. And monitoringThreadIsAlive can be used to know if the thread is still running.

    monitoringCanRun = true;
    new Thread(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        monitoringThreadIsAlive = true;
        performMonitoring();
        monitoringThreadIsAlive = false;
    }
    }).start();
}

and performMonitoring looks like:

   public void performMonitoring() {
while (monitoringCanRun) {
   ... do your read in the while loop
    ...you might like to insert some delay before trying again...
    try { //we delay every partial read so we are not too fast for the other side
    Thread.sleep(100);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
I have a tablet connected to the Wi-Fi, this connects to my computer which is broadcasting on 172.20.104.203 on port 5334, I can see when the thread starts, but nothing after that. –  FabianCook Apr 16 '12 at 21:00
    
Try in.ready() -> Tell whether this stream is ready to be read. A buffered character stream is ready if the buffer is not empty, or if the underlying character stream is ready. –  user387184 Apr 16 '12 at 21:07
    
If statement? Or something else? because wouldn't it skip it completely if it is a if statement –  FabianCook Apr 16 '12 at 21:13
    
That's the point - if it't not ready it will skip it completely and never ever come back again to really read from the socket. The only way then is to create a run-loop with an (in)definite while statement. I update my answer... –  user387184 Apr 16 '12 at 21:20
    
I opened telnet with "adb shell telnet 172.20.104.203:5334" and set it a command and it works? Instantly –  FabianCook Apr 16 '12 at 21:28

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