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I am using Hibernate as the ORM for a database that has a number of foreign key relationships. The problem is that sometimes I want to fetch these related datasets and sometimes I do not, so on these collections I have set "fetch" to "lazy". Unfortunately, every time I try to serialize these objects Hibernate will throw a LazyInitializationException, because the session is closed. Using an OpenSessionInView filter simply causes Hibernate to populate these collections anyway, thus defeating the whole purpose of having a lazy collection in the first place.

Is there a simple way to serialize or otherwise extract the data populated in the POJO without triggering the LIE, and without having to populate all of the lazy collections?

EDIT: Here is some example code I am trying to get working, dealing with two tables, "Departments" and "Employees," which is the child in a one-to-many relationship with Departments. I want to be able to view the Departments listed in the database, without having to load all of the Employees that belong to said Departments:

Departments:

package com.test.model;
// Generated Apr 7, 2012 7:10:28 PM by Hibernate Tools 3.4.0.CR1

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;
import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.FetchType;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import static javax.persistence.GenerationType.IDENTITY;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.OneToMany;
import javax.persistence.Table;

/**
 * Departments generated by hbm2java
 */
@Entity
@Table(name="Departments"
    ,catalog="test"
)
public class Departments  implements java.io.Serializable {


     private Integer id;
     private String name;
     private Set<Employees> employeeses = new HashSet(0);

    public Departments() {
    }


    public Departments(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
    public Departments(String name, Set employeeses) {
       this.name = name;
       this.employeeses = employeeses;
    }

     @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy=IDENTITY)


    @Column(name="Id", unique=true, nullable=false)
    public Integer getId() {
        return this.id;
    }

    public void setId(Integer id) {
        this.id = id;
    }


    @Column(name="Name", nullable=false)
    public String getName() {
        return this.name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, mappedBy="departments")
    public Set<Employees> getEmployeeses() {
        return this.employeeses;
    }

    public void setEmployeeses(Set employeeses) {
        this.employeeses = employeeses;
    }
}

Employees:

package com.test.model;
// Generated Apr 7, 2012 7:10:28 PM by Hibernate Tools 3.4.0.CR1


import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.FetchType;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import static javax.persistence.GenerationType.IDENTITY;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.JoinColumn;
import javax.persistence.ManyToOne;
import javax.persistence.Table;

/**
 * Employees generated by hbm2java
 */
@Entity
@Table(name="Employees"
    ,catalog="test"
)
public class Employees  implements java.io.Serializable {


     private Integer id;
     private Departments departments;
     private String firstName;
     private String lastName;

    public Employees() {
    }

    public Employees(Departments departments, String firstName, String lastName) {
       this.departments = departments;
       this.firstName = firstName;
       this.lastName = lastName;
    }

     @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy=IDENTITY)


    @Column(name="Id", unique=true, nullable=false)
    public Integer getId() {
        return this.id;
    }

    public void setId(Integer id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name="DepartmentsId", nullable=false)
    public Departments getDepartments() {
        return this.departments;
    }

    public void setDepartments(Departments departments) {
        this.departments = departments;
    }


    @Column(name="FirstName", nullable=false)
    public String getFirstName() {
        return this.firstName;
    }

    public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
    }


    @Column(name="LastName", nullable=false)
    public String getLastName() {
        return this.lastName;
    }

    public void setLastName(String lastName) {
        this.lastName = lastName;
    }
}

My action class (which gets serialized by the Struts2 XSLT result):

package com.test.view;

import java.util.List;

import java.util.Iterator;

import com.opensymphony.xwork2.ActionSupport;
import com.test.controller.DepartmentsManager;
import com.test.model.Departments;
import com.test.util.HibernateUtil;

public class DepartmentsAction extends ActionSupport {
private DepartmentsManager departmentsManager;
private List<Departments> departmentsList;

public DepartmentsAction() {
    this.departmentsManager = new DepartmentsManager();
}

public String list() {
    this.departmentsList = departmentsManager.list();
    System.out.println("Execute called");
    HibernateUtil.createDTO(departmentsList);
    return SUCCESS;
}

public List<Departments> getDepartmentsList() {
    return departmentsList;
}

public void setDepartmentsList(List<Departments> departmentsList) {
    this.departmentsList = departmentsList;
}
}

My Manager class (which the Action class calls to populate the list of Departments):

package com.test.controller;

import java.util.List;

import java.util.Iterator;

import org.hibernate.Criteria;
import org.hibernate.Hibernate;
import org.hibernate.HibernateException;
import org.hibernate.Query;
import org.hibernate.Session;

import com.test.model.Departments;
import com.test.util.HibernateUtil;

public class DepartmentsManager {
public List<Departments> list() {
    Session session = HibernateUtil.getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession();
    session.beginTransaction();
    List<Departments> set = null;
    try {
        Query q = session.createQuery("FROM Departments");
        /*Query q = session.createQuery("FROM Departments d JOIN FETCH d.employeeses e");*/
        q.setResultTransformer(Criteria.DISTINCT_ROOT_ENTITY);
        set = (List<Departments>) q.list();
    } catch (HibernateException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        session.getTransaction().rollback();
    }
    session.getTransaction().commit();
    return set;
}
}
share|improve this question
2  
OSIV is the correct way to do it. It sounds like the collections are populated "anyway" because you're using them so you need them to be populated. –  Matt Ball Apr 16 '12 at 20:57
    
Actually, I am not using them. The problem is that the whole object gets passed into the Struts2 xslt result object, which dutifully goes through the object and tries to parse everything into XML. As soon as it tries to serialize and parse the lazy-loaded collection (which has not been loaded, because I do not need it at the moment), Hibernate throws an exception. It would be a lot more helpful if Hibernate were to just return "null" and let the parser go on about its business. –  TennSeven Apr 16 '12 at 23:45
    
It sounds like a passing an intermediate object (representing the view of your entity that you actually want to serialize) to Struts is a not-too-smelly way to do this. Does that make sense? If not, I can try to elaborate in an answer. (Take this with a grain of salt, since I am completely unfamiliar with Struts2 XSLT result objects.) –  Matt Ball Apr 17 '12 at 0:36
    
Yes, this makes perfect sense, and it would be my preferred way of going about it, short of passing the Hibernate object itself. The problem is, how do I create the intermediate object? I need some way to check an entity's various lazy-loaded collections to see if they are populated or not, so I can add in the ones that are populated and leave the others alone, all without triggering the LazyInitializationException. –  TennSeven Apr 17 '12 at 0:59
    
Nope, sorry, no can do - not like that. You might be able to (with try/catch(LazyInitializationException) but that's quite smelly). What I mean is: create a separate class for each view you wish to present; the set of possible views is thus fixed and determined at compile time, not runtime. –  Matt Ball Apr 17 '12 at 1:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Lazy collections work only within the scope of the transaction (where the owning entity was retrieved from a DB). In other words, you should not pass a Hibernate entity with non-loaded lazy sub-entities or collections outside the transaction scope.

You need either to build another entity or use lazy="false" if you want to pass an entity to JSP, or serialization code or anything else.

share|improve this answer
    
Eugene, what is the easiest way of building another entity, leaving out the non-loaded collections? Any time you try to directly access the collection to see if it is there or not, Hibernate will throw the Lazy Initialization Exception. What is the best method of doing this? –  TennSeven Apr 16 '12 at 23:01
    
1. Building an entity copy should be done inside the transaction. 2. I prefer to use lazy="false" - as for web-apps usually we need the whole tree of data. But we limit the number of records we fetch (with setMaxRecords) - i.e. pagination. This put limits on data we query and transfer. –  Eugene Retunsky Apr 16 '12 at 23:18
    
Eugene, 1. Can you give me a good example of how you copy the entities? I am not sure how this process works. 2. If I use "setMaxRecords," does that just constrain the top-level entity, or does it also constrain the associate collections? In my database, I might be grabbing a table that only has a few entities, but each of those entities may be connected to hundreds of thousands of other entities that I do not need at the moment (which is why I was trying to set lazy to true). –  TennSeven Apr 16 '12 at 23:35
    
Can you post some code? I need an example of what you're doing to understand better how this can be solved. –  Eugene Retunsky Apr 16 '12 at 23:39
    
Eugene, I added the code to the original question. The first two are my entities, "Departments" and "Employees." Next is DepartmentsAction, which gets called by Struts2 and then returned back to it for serialization. Next is DepartmentsManger, which the Action class calls to populate the list of Departments. In this case I simply want to get a list of the Departments in the database without grabbing all of the Employees that belong to those Departments. However, at some other point I might want to grab everything, which is why I need to leave the Employees collection in the Departments class. –  TennSeven Apr 16 '12 at 23:57

Two simple ways to manage lazy loading within view :

  • Using a Transaction view (consisting in wrapping view calls into JTA transaction (application-managed for instance)

  • Using an extented persistence context in your bean and flushing it explicitely when you've done with it, that means as soon as you were able to load your lazy objects.

For more information, check this post and the answer that belongs to it:

JPA lazy loading Collections in JSF view - better way than using Filters?

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