Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

ViewModel:

[Required]
public int Hours { get; set; }

Razor:

@Html.EditorFor(m => m.Hours)

Output:

<input type="text" value="0" name="Hours" id="Hours" 
 data-val-required="The field is required." 
 data-val-number="The field must be a number."
 data-val="true" class="text-box single-line valid">

What gives, why is the value being automatically populated with 0. It is pretty much bypassing validation in that the user can submit this without actually entering anything.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your property's type is int which is value type with the default value of 0.

If you want the Reuired attribute properly work make Hours nullable:

[Required]
public int? Hours { get; set; }
share|improve this answer
    
I have done this with dropdownfor lists. Why exactly is it that using the nullable type here changes the auto-population. And also, are there any side-affects (aside from reading in Hours.value in c#)? –  Travis J Apr 16 '12 at 22:09
    
When you write @Html.EditorFor(m => m.Hours) and if your model does not contain a value for Hours, the framework must put something there as value. So it uses the type's default value which is 0 in your case. For string and reference types the default value is null which will be converted to value="". You won't have any problem from the nullable beside the Hours.Value access mode. –  nemesv Apr 16 '12 at 22:16
    
isn't there another way? I want the viewmodel to have an int not an int? but I want the form to start 'empty' on a new creation. –  Bart Jun 11 '13 at 20:23
    
@Bart there is no real other way. However you can have two viewmodels: one for the view where you have a int? and one "input"viewmodel for your POST action where you have the int. By the way why is it a problem to have a int? on your viewmodel? –  nemesv Jun 11 '13 at 20:34
    
That will do it. It's overbloated for a simple post viewmodel but it's ok in general. The problem with using int? isn't actually a problem but dont like the idea of converting the post viewmodel to a ValueObject (VO) doing : Total = total.Value. I would prefer to have that never throws an exception and assigns 0 by default. looks like it's open for some 'bugs' this way. not sure tho, more like a bad-feeling –  Bart Jun 11 '13 at 21:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.