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Hello I am currently trying to learn assembly in c++ on my own. I have assembly code in my project that is currently in a high level c++ for loop, I need help converting this to be entirly assembly if possible, here is the code how I have it at the moment:

char temp_char;
for (int i = 0; i < length; i++){
    temp_char = characters [i];
    __asm {                         
        push eax    
        push ecx
        movsx ecx,temp_char
        movsx eax,key   
        push ecx    
        push eax
        call test
        add esp, 8
        mov temp_char,al
        pop ecx 
        pop eax
    }
}
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Just semantics: note that you are looking for assembly code and not assembler. Assembler is that thing that convertes assembly into binary code... –  amit Apr 16 '12 at 23:20
    
@amit Thank you have edited:) –  Paul Apr 16 '12 at 23:21
    
Why are you not simply checking the results from the compiler? I guess even VisualC++ supports outputting assembly language files from the results of compiling C/C++ code. Or if that fails, use a disassembler on the resulting binary to learn from your compiler. –  Till Apr 16 '12 at 23:30
    
Sorry I tried to look at the disassembler but it didnt make too much sense to me. –  Paul Apr 16 '12 at 23:31
    
@Paul- If you are examining the compiler's assembly output, I recommend disabling all forms of optimization before building. This keeps the assembly as true to the underlying code as possible. Assembly that has been heavily optimized can end up extremely confusing. –  bta Apr 16 '12 at 23:35

1 Answer 1

Your for line has three parts to it. When thinking at the assembly level, it helps to break these apart. An easy way to do this is to re-write the for as a while:

char temp_char;

int i = 0;
while (i < length) {
    temp_char = characters [i];
    __asm {                         
        push eax    
        push ecx
        movsx ecx,temp_char
        movsx eax,key   
        push ecx    
        push eax
        call test
        add esp, 8
        mov temp_char,al
        pop ecx 
        pop eax
    }
    i++;
}

You should be able to convert the int i=0 and i++ lines into assembly rather easily. The only thing left is the while. The top of a while is typically implemented as a condition and a jump (or a conditional jump, if your platform supports such operations). If the condition is true, move into the loop; if the condition is false, skip the loop (jump to the end). The bottom of a while is simply an unconditional jump back to the top of the loop.

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Thank you for the help, im a little closer now, still confused a bit but im getting there, is the nature of learning:) –  Paul Apr 16 '12 at 23:53
    
@Paul- Try starting as basic as possible. Create the simplest loop you can, perhaps something like for (int i=0; i<10; ++i) { ++x; }. Compile it with all optimizations disabled and take a look at the emitted assembly. Walk through the code twice using the debugger (once debugging on the C level and once debugging on the assembly level). You should begin to get the feel for what is happening once you see it in action a couple of times. A debugger that can show the C code and the emitted assembly side-by-side makes this easier. –  bta Apr 17 '12 at 16:10

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