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Here is my situation. I have some links throughout a website. Some of them look like this:

<a target="_blank" onclick="someFunction()" href="/somFile.pdf">some file</a>

and some look like this:

<a target="_blank" href="/somFile.pdf">some file</a>

All of the links should be calling someFunction() when clicked. The ones that have the call in the onclick attribute are legacy content pages. Newer pages have a jQuery click event attached to them like so:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $('a[href$=".pdf"]').click(function() {
    someFunction();
  });
});

So here's the thing. I can update someFunction(), but I cannot touch the actual links or that jQuery. What I need is to know the href value of the link clicked. I have tried using the following within someFunction() :

var ev = window.event;
origEl = ev.target || ev.srcElement;
console.log(origEl.href);

but this does not work. I also tried console.log(window.event) and get nothing, says it is undefined. Any idea what I'm missing here, or is it basically impossible without passing a reference to it when the function is called?

edit: to be clear, I cannot as a short or even medium term solution edit the call to someFunction() in the onclick or in the jQuery code black, so I cannot for instance change them to someFunction(this) or similar. I'm not sure it is possible to get the href from within someFunction() unless I do that though :(

share|improve this question
    
My fiddle works as you requested. I did have to modify your code blocks, but ONLY to prevent the link from actually trying to get something, and to conform the rest of the code accordingly due to the missing pdf reference link. –  Lazerblade Apr 16 '12 at 23:55

5 Answers 5

You don't need anything other than this.href inside of the click callback.

$(document).ready(function()
{    
    function someFunction(foo)
    {
        console.log(foo);
    }

    $('a[href$=".pdf"]').click(function()
    {
        someFunction(this.href);
    });
});

Alternately, you can make this point to the <a> even inside of someFunction, like so:

$(document).ready(function()
{    
    function someFunction()
    {
        console.log(this.href);
        console.log(event);
    }

    $('a[href$=".pdf"]').click(someFunction);
});

or if that doesn't suit you, we can get fancier with Function.apply:

$(document).ready(function()
{    
    function someFunction(event)
    {
        console.log(this.href);
        console.log(event);
    }

    $('a[href$=".pdf"]').click(function (event)
    {
        someFunction.apply(this, event);
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
OP said he can't touch the click function. He said has to do it in javascript but without making changes to the top 2 sections of code. –  Lazerblade Apr 16 '12 at 23:36
    
It was not completely clear exactly what cannot be changed about the jQuery code. If nothing can be changed, then it cannot be done. –  Matt Ball Apr 16 '12 at 23:39
    
right...I cannot change anything in the jQuery codeblock or the onclick call.. so I can't just do someFunction(this); Also, I tried doing console.log(this.href); inside someFunction() and it too gave me 'undefined' –  mysql_noobie_xxxx Apr 16 '12 at 23:46
1  
well anyways, I gave a +1 for effort, guess I will just need to tell the client to suck it, no joy until they do what needs to be done :/ –  mysql_noobie_xxxx Apr 17 '12 at 1:28
1  
@mysql_noobie_xxxx so it goes with legacy code. I live this daily. –  Matt Ball Apr 17 '12 at 1:31

Use either this.href, or the more jQuery appropriate $(this).attr('href') to get the value of each of your links.

share|improve this answer
2  
There is absolutely no need to use .attr() in this case. this.href works in all browsers, and has better performance, and is significantly more concise. stackoverflow.com/a/4652402/139010 –  Matt Ball Apr 16 '12 at 23:35
    
@MДΓΓБДLL: I was under the impression that 'older' versions of IE (though I can't recall which versions) required this.getAttribute('href') rather than the simple this.href? Sorry I can't provide support for this understanding, though...just one of those things I've believed for so long, I guess. =/ –  David Thomas Apr 16 '12 at 23:37
    
@DavidThomas I could be wrong, since I use that answer as reference but have not tested it myself (I run OS X at work and home, and a VM is quite simply not worth the effort). –  Matt Ball Apr 16 '12 at 23:40
1  
@MДΓΓБДLL: what can I say? 'S a good reference..! Though I'm still curious. Perhaps a job for tomorrow, then. Or...whenever I next remember about it. –  David Thomas Apr 16 '12 at 23:44
1  
I added console.log(this.href); inside someFunction() and it said 'undefined' :( –  mysql_noobie_xxxx Apr 16 '12 at 23:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

So I let this simmer for a while and I did come up with a short term solution...it's pretty hacky and I feel kinda dirty for doing it but sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do until you can do what you need to do... anyways, I'm posting my ugly solution here for others who might be backed into a similar corner...

Keep in mind, the only code I'm allowed to touch in OP is the someFunction() function itself. Also, I can add some extra code in the same place as where it located, which is what I have done...

Basically the solution is to make an additional click listener that puts the href value into a variable exposed to the function, and hen wrap the someFunction() code in a small timeout to make sure the new click function can do its thing..

<!-- STUFF I CAN'T TOUCH! (located on-page) -->
<a target="_blank" onclick="someFunction()" href="/somFile.pdf">some file</a>
<a target="_blank" href="/somFile.pdf">some file</a>

<script type='text/javascript'>
$(document).ready(function(){
  $('a[href$=".pdf"]').click(function() {
    someFunction();
  });
});
</script>
<!-- END STUFF I CAN'T TOUCH! -->

/*** STUFF I CAN TOUCH! (located in a script include) ***/
// hackjob!
$(document).ready(function(){
  $('a').click(function() {
    if ($(this).attr('href')) someFunction.href = $(this).attr('href');
  });
});

function someFunction(a) {
  // more hackjob!
  window.setTimeout("console.log(someFunction.href);",200);
}
/*** END STUFF I CAN TOUCH!***/

So anyways, yeah it's ugly, but hopefully it might save someone's arse if they are desperate.

share|improve this answer
    
Good idea. Just two tweaks: 1. Reduce the timeout to 0. You don't need 200ms and you risk missing double-clicks. 2. Don't save the href to someFunction.href, just use a variable in a shared scope. –  Pumbaa80 Apr 19 '12 at 4:36

Here ya go. Try this. Adjust accordingly for your needs (I removed the pdf link because one didn't exist in my fiddle).

EDIT: Tested in FF and Chrome. Let me know if it works for ya.

http://jsfiddle.net/lazerblade01/dTVz5/22/

share|improve this answer
    
Hello Lazerblade: I went to your link (using the latest version of FF) and console log gives me an error message "event is not defined" –  mysql_noobie_xxxx Apr 17 '12 at 0:01
    
Yeah, I tested in Chrome. I'll see if I can get to work in FF also, give me a few minutes. Need to adjust. –  Lazerblade Apr 17 '12 at 0:12
    
AFAIK, window.event is not cross-browser compatible. I'm surprised it works in anything other than IE, and I seriously doubt you'll be able to ever use window.event in Firefox. –  Matt Ball Apr 17 '12 at 0:29
    
No need to. Think outside the box. If you can't capture the event inside the first section of code because you can't change it, then what do you do? –  Lazerblade Apr 17 '12 at 0:30
    
The hoops that code jumps through to achieve FF compatibility are completely unnecessary, and you still changed the jQuery event binding code. At that rate, you might as well use one of the (much cleaner) options that I presented. –  Matt Ball Apr 17 '12 at 0:32

Here it is in PURE JavaScript

    //assuming links inside of a shared class "link"
    for(var i in document.getElementsByClassName('link')) {
        var link = document.getElementsByClassName('link')[i];

        link.onclick = function(e) { 
            e.preventDefault();

            //using returned e attributes
            window.location = e.srcElement.attributes.href.textContent;     
        } 
    } 

    //tested on Chrome v31 & IE 11
    //not working in Firefox v29
    //to make it work in all browsers use something like:

    if (e.srcElement === undefined){
    //scrElement is undefined in Firefox and textContent is depreciated

      window.location = e.originalTarget.attributes.href.value;
    } else {
      window.location = e.srcElement.attributes.href.textContent;
    }

    //Furthermore; when you setAttribute("key" "value"); 
    //you can access it with the above node link. 
    //So say you want to set an objectId on something     
    //manually and then grab it later; you can use 

    //Chrome & IE
    //srcElement.attributes.objectid.textContent; 

    //Firefox
    //e.originalTarget.attributes.objectid.value;

    //*Note: for some unknown reason the attribute being defined as "objectId" is changed to "objectid" when it's set.
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