Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to generate blowfish hashes and I was wondering if it's safe enough to count on mt_rand() to generate my salts for me?

function blowfish($string, $salt = NULL, $iterations = '08')
{
    if( ! $salt)
    {
        $seed = "./ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
        for ($i = 0; $i < 22; $i++)
        {
            $salt .= $seed{mt_rand(0, 63)};
        }
        $salt = '$2a$' . $iterations . '$' . $salt;
    }

    return crypt($string, $salt);
}

The character $seed above is the allowed 64-character blowfish-salt alphabet. I plan on using this to generate and compare passwords.

$password = 'my^$%#password';
$hash = blowfish($password);

if($hash = blowfish($password, $hash))
{
    print "Matches\n";
    print $hash . "\n";
}

Edit

I never realized this, but what @zerkms says is true. Salts are only to prevent reusable precomputed attacks since the salt is known at the same point that they have access to the hash. So the goal isn't a non-reversible salt - it's a random salt.

So, anything wrong with this?

function blowfish($string, $salt = NULL, $iterations = '12')
{
    return crypt($string, $salt ?: "$2a\$$iterations$" . md5(uniqid('', true)));
}

Also, as noted in the title and above code, I'm not implementing my own hashing algorithm.

Update 2

Using the mcrypt extension if loaded leads to the following, which is actually faster probably because uniqid (u)sleeps or something.

function blowfish($string, $salt = NULL, $iterations = '12')
{
    return crypt($string, $salt ?: "$2a\$$iterations$" . base64_encode(mcrypt_create_iv(22, MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM)));
}

Update 3

base64_encode is faster than md5 - but it has invalid blowfish characters in it like +. So changed to md5 now.

function blowfish($string, $salt = NULL, $iterations = '12')
{
    return crypt($string, $salt ?: "$2a\$$iterations$" . md5(mcrypt_create_iv(22, MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM)));
}
share|improve this question
2  
Salt generation algorithm doesn't matter. What matters is that you have different salts for each password. ps: personally I think your current salt generation is overengineered and I would go with just md5(uniqid('', true)) –  zerkms Apr 16 '12 at 23:37
1  
@pst: Any real issues with my advice? –  zerkms Apr 16 '12 at 23:51
    
you could use $salt = substr(str_shuffle("./ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz012345‌​6789"), -22); probably quicker.. –  Loz Cherone Apr 16 '12 at 23:55
2  
ps: seems like there is another programming myth here: about overestimation of the salt generation algorithms. –  zerkms Apr 16 '12 at 23:56
3  
@Lattyware: "It means you are letting them know what salts you are using" --- so what? Salt is not intended to be secret. "which in theory means they could precompute attacks" --- rainbow tables nowadays are nonsense, CPU is cheaper codinghorror.com/blog/2012/04/speed-hashing.html PS: uniqid('', true) is barely predictable and it is not just numbers –  zerkms Apr 17 '12 at 0:02
show 8 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use mcrypt to create a salt.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good idea, I can use MCRYPT_DEV_RANDOM instead of manually opening a connection to /dev/urandom and reading from it and then converting it to base64. –  Xeoncross Apr 16 '12 at 23:57
    
MCRYPT_DEV_RANDOM opens a connection to /dev/random not /dev/urandom. MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM do open a connection to /dev/urandom. –  aymericbeaumet Oct 21 '13 at 12:44
add comment

Using mt_rand for your salt, is secure enough; provided obviously that you utilize a per password different random salt.

However, with that said; nearly any self-implemented password hashing system is insecure. Few individuals are well versed enough to generate and maintain a secure password hashing system. For reference I implore you to read over a few SO threads:

Php/Password best practices

Salt generation and PHP

Do not roll your own

I suggest DO NOT ROLL YOUR OWN. Period. Please look into using the established library of PhPass of password hashing for PHP if possible. Benefits include real-world application testing, highly secure implementation, and extreme ease of use.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Security take a lot of time and skill to do right. Why not take advantage of those who have made the mistakes before you have? –  Lattyware Apr 16 '12 at 23:47
4  
"self-implemented password hashing system is insecure" --- I don't see self-implemented hashing there, do I? –  zerkms Apr 16 '12 at 23:47
1  
@pst: do you have anything real against md5 + uniqid for generating salt? –  zerkms Apr 16 '12 at 23:53
3  
@pst: salt generation algorithm doesn't matter - the only thing that matters is that result salt is random. I'm sorry, but I'm being boring discussing such trivial things –  zerkms Apr 17 '12 at 0:10
2  
@zerkms No worries, you were completely right. It's always annoying when you can't get someone to understand what you mean, and I was at fault. –  Lattyware Apr 17 '12 at 0:15
show 9 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.