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So, Iv'e been learning C# lately but there is one thing I cant figure out or find an answer to:

Consider this:

class Class1 {
    int myInt = 32;
}

and this:

class Class1 {
    int myInt;

    public Class1(){
        myInt = 32;
    }
}

I would simply like to know when and why I should use one method over the other for assigning or instantiating values.

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I believe the first method is a private or we call it encapsulate in which that myInt will be private to non member, but on the other that one will be available to the public member function to display or change that variable. –  Ali Apr 17 '12 at 0:22
    
This is likely to be a very subjective question and every programmer will have their own preference. However, I would suggest the second is clearer, simply because you don't have to search all over the class definition to find the default values of a new instance. –  mellamokb Apr 17 '12 at 0:23
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is a matter of taste or coding standards of your company.

My rule of thumb is that if all my constructors assign the same value to a variable, I use the first form; if the value comes from outside, or different constructors assign different values to a variable, I use the second form.

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First off, you must initialize in the ctor when the initialization requires a reference to "this", either explicitly or implicitly:

class C
{
    int x = MakeX();  
    int MakeX() { whatever } 
}

That's illegal, because the call is implicitly to this.MakeX() and you haven't even run the ctor yet, so it is probably wrong to use this. This is legal:

class C
{
    int x;
    int MakeX() { whatever }
    public C() { this.x = this.MakeX(); } 
}

because obviously we cannot restrict use of this in the ctor body itself.

Also note that the field initializers run in order from most derived to least derived and run first. The base class constructors run in order from least derived to most derived and run second. That rarely matters, but it is helpful to know anyway.

Generally the advice is just "be consistent". Do not initialize some fields with initializers and some with statements in the ctor body; pick one and do it consistently.

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It's mostly up to personal preference or coding conventions for your project if you're working in industry, i.e. there is no "right" or "wrong" way to initialize member variables. In the end, what matters is that you're consistent in how you do it.

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