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I have blocks stored in an NSDictionary. This is one of those blocks:

void(^RunningApplications)(void) = ^{
        NSArray *runningApps = [[NSWorkspace sharedWorkspace] runningApplications];
        NSMutableArray *appNames = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:[runningApps count]];
        for (NSRunningApplication *app in runningApps)
            [appNames addObject:[app localizedName]];
        NSLog(@"%@", [[NSWorkspace sharedWorkspace] runningApplications]);
    };

The first time I access this block I see the apps that are currently running through NSLog. However, if I open another app, then call the block again I only see the original list that was displayed rather than a new list with the newly opened app. How can I receive an updated list via this block?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your issue has nothing to do with blocks (or dictionaries) and everything to do with how you are (ab)using -runningApplications. From the docs:

Similar to the NSRunningApplication class’s properties, this property will only change when the main run loop is run in a common mode. Instead of polling, use key-value observing to be notified of changes to this array property.

To this end, the following demonstrates proper behavior:

#import "AppDelegate.h"

const static NSString *runningApplicationsContext = @"running applications observation";

@implementation AppDelegate

@synthesize window = _window;

- (void)dealloc
{
    [[NSWorkspace sharedWorkspace] removeObserver:self
                                       forKeyPath:@"runningApplications"
                                          context:&runningApplicationsContext];
    [super dealloc];
}

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    [[NSWorkspace sharedWorkspace] addObserver:self
                                    forKeyPath:@"runningApplications"
                                       options:NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew
                                       context:&runningApplicationsContext];
}

- (void)observeValueForKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath 
                      ofObject:(id)object 
                        change:(NSDictionary *)change 
                       context:(void *)context
{
    if (context == &runningApplicationsContext) {
        NSArray *runningApps = [(NSWorkspace *)object runningApplications];
        NSMutableArray *appNames = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:[runningApps count]];
        for (NSRunningApplication *app in runningApps) {
            [appNames addObject:[app localizedName]];
        }
        NSLog(@"%@", [[NSWorkspace sharedWorkspace] runningApplications]);
        [appNames release];
    }
}

This has another nice advantage: you examine the change dictionary to determine what application(s) triggered the notification, in case you are interested. This frees you from caching/tracking previous runningApplications results.

EDIT: Following up on your comment, here's some code that works just fine with your block (stripped of dead code that I presume did something in your larger app) stored in a dictionary and called from the observer method:

#import "AppDelegate.h"

const static NSString *runningApplicationsContext = @"running applications observation";

@interface AppDelegate () {
    NSDictionary *_blocks;
}

@end

@implementation AppDelegate

@synthesize window = _window;

- (void)dealloc
{
    [[NSWorkspace sharedWorkspace] removeObserver:self
                                       forKeyPath:@"runningApplications"
                                          context:&runningApplicationsContext];
    [_blocks release];
    [super dealloc];
}

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    _blocks = [[NSDictionary alloc] initWithObjectsAndKeys:(id)
               ^{
                   NSLog(@"%@", [[NSWorkspace sharedWorkspace] runningApplications]);
               }, @"RunningApplications",
               nil];

    [[NSWorkspace sharedWorkspace] addObserver:self
                                    forKeyPath:@"runningApplications"
                                       options:NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew
                                       context:&runningApplicationsContext];
}

- (void)observeValueForKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath 
                      ofObject:(id)object 
                        change:(NSDictionary *)change 
                       context:(void *)context
{
    if (context == &runningApplicationsContext) {
        dispatch_block_t getRunningApplications = [_blocks objectForKey:@"RunningApplications"];
        getRunningApplications();
    }
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info, however it doesn't quite answer my question. I understand that polling runningApplications is not the proper way of doing this but I don't believe it is the reason I am not getting an updated list. I have done this polling before and received updated lists, the issue only occurs when I access the block from my dictionary. –  sud0 Apr 17 '12 at 2:26
    
I have posted code that implements blocks-in-dictionaries with no ill effects. I'm almost certain that your problem is that your polling method is breaking the run loop assumptions in some way. When I test your code, for example, in a while() loop it definitely doesn't work. –  Conrad Shultz Apr 17 '12 at 2:45
    
Thanks again for the info and code. I will be implementing this in future programs but it doesn't suffice for my current issue. The only difference between your code and mine is you update the list of programs when a new one has been opened whereas mine returns a list at the user's request. Yet the list I receive from the initial request never changes upon subsequent requests even when new apps are opened. –  sud0 Apr 17 '12 at 16:08

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