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I have some reports to do with MySQL and the below code is my current solution to the problem.

It seems quite straight forward until I start considering when staff shifts go over midnight so the query has to be adjusted. Right now I have php generate different queries depending on the date/time span as follows:

If the work shift falls whithin the same day (ie: 8am-8pm across 2 days):

SELECT <select statements>
FROM <from statements>
WHERE
(
    (Date = '2012-04-16' AND Time BETWEEN '08:00:00' AND '20:00:00')
    OR
    (Date = '2012-04-02' AND Time BETWEEN '08:00:00' AND '20:00:00')
);

If the shift goes over midnight it gets complex (ie: 8pm-8am across 2 days):

SELECT <select statements>
FROM <from statements>
WHERE
(
    (
        (Date = '2012-04-16' AND Time >= '20:00:00')
        OR
        (Date = '2012-04-17' AND Time <= '08:00:00')
    )
    OR
    (
        (Date = '2012-04-17' AND Time >= '20:00:00')
        OR
        (Date = '2012-04-18' AND Time <= '08:00:00')
    )
);

As you can imagine, these queries get really long and heavy with every single day I add to the report. There must be a smarter way to do this - could anyone offer any insight?

share|improve this question
1  
It is quite possible these queries get really long and heavy because of joins or parts of the query you are not showing or due to lack of proper indexing. There is not much you can do here apart from combining your date and time into one datetime type field. –  piotrm Apr 17 '12 at 2:56
    
Thanks for the comment - the query itself can run quite quickly actually, just wondering if there is a simpler way of writing it that's all. Seems overly complex to me and thought there's be a KISS principle to this. Just out of curiosity, how would joining the date and time stamps help? I would still be having to compare in between the time each separate day right? –  francisco.preller Apr 17 '12 at 3:20
    
Yes, however that would simplify your query a bit, you could stop worrying about going over midnight and use conditions like dtime BETWEEN '2012-04-17 20:00:00' AND '2012-04-18 08:00:00' –  piotrm Apr 17 '12 at 4:55
    
Thanks. Might look into this, unsure if its more complex to join the date & time columns at run time than it is to leave the queries as it is. I have a php script which generates the long query for me. Changing the tables themselves is out of the question, there is over 40 databases with up to 6 million records in each. –  francisco.preller Apr 17 '12 at 7:08
    
@piotrm: Your suggestion is not very good I think. This query maybe simpler but a query with date BETWEEN '2012-01-01' AND '2012-04-30' will be a bit more complicated and will have to use an 8-byte index instead of a 4-byte now. –  ypercube Apr 18 '12 at 11:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to have more elegant code, this part:

    (Date = '2012-04-16' AND Time >= '20:00:00')
    OR
    (Date = '2012-04-17' AND Time <= '08:00:00')

could be changed into:

    (Date, Time) >= (DATE('2012-04-16'), TIME('20:00:00'))
    AND 
    (Date, Time) <= (DATE('2012-04-17'), TIME('08:00:00'))

Compound index on (Date, Time) would help in both yours and the above version.


If you have several of those conditions, like your example:

SELECT <select statements>
FROM <from statements>
WHERE
(
    (
        (Date = '2012-04-16' AND Time >= '20:00:00')
        OR
        (Date = '2012-04-17' AND Time <= '08:00:00')
    )
    OR
    .....
    OR 
    (
        (Date = '2012-05-27' AND Time >= '20:00:00')
        OR
        (Date = '2012-05-28' AND Time <= '08:00:00')
    )
)

you could turn it into:

SELECT <select statements>
FROM <from statements>
  CROSS JOIN
      ( SELECT TIME('20:00:00') AS start_time
             , TIME('08:00:00') AS end_time
      ) AS cc
  JOIN
      ( SELECT d                   AS this_day
             , d + INTERVAL 1 DAY  AS next_day
        FROM
          ( SELECT DATE('2012-04-16') AS d
          UNION ALL
            ...
          UNION ALL
            SELECT '2012-05-27'
          ) AS s 
      ) AS selected
     ON  (Date, Time) >= (selected.this_day, cc.start_time)
     AND (Date, Time) <= (selected.next_day, cc.end_time  )
share|improve this answer
    
that's much nicer! will run the same tests I ran on the other queries to get an idea of performance with this :) –  francisco.preller Apr 18 '12 at 9:50
    
With the first section of example you gave me (see: (Date, Time) >= ('2012-04-16', '20:00:00') AND (Date, Time) <= ('2012-04-17', '08:00:00')) - I am actually getting different results than my original query... My query: #9,009 total, Query took 0.0116 sec Your query: #19,886 total, Query took 14.7073 sec --- testing the second section shortly also. –  francisco.preller Apr 18 '12 at 10:31
    
Note that my queries are samples for when the shift goes over midnight. None of them is equivalent to your first code snippet. –  ypercube Apr 18 '12 at 10:40
    
About performance, I wouldn't expect major difference. Do you have a compound index on (Date, Time) Are Date and Time columns of DATE and TIME datatype? Or are they calculated? –  ypercube Apr 18 '12 at 10:43
1  
Yes, exactly like that. –  ypercube Apr 18 '12 at 11:32

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