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Given

IList<int> indexes;
ICollection<T> collection;

What is the most elegant way to extract all T in collection based on the the indexes provided in indexes?

For example, if collection contained

"Brian", "Cleveland", "Joe", "Glenn", "Mort"

And indexes contained

1, 3

The return would be

"Cleveland," "Glenn"

Edit: Assume that indexes is always sorted ascending.

share|improve this question
1  
@Bob, you asked for elegance. Eric's answer is correct and super fast, but having a method end with 5 * } ( } } } } } ) is not super elegant –  Sam Saffron Jun 22 '09 at 0:51
1  
@Sam, From google define:elegant - "refined and tasteful in appearance or behavior or style" I found Eric's answer to be tasteful in the way it behaves. The curly braces don't bother me. I also find elegance in the simplicity of the way the problem is solved. –  Bob Jun 22 '09 at 12:40

14 Answers 14

up vote 21 down vote accepted

This assumes that the index sequence is a monotone ascending sequence of non-negative indices. The strategy is straightforward: for each index, bump up an enumerator on the collection to that point and yield the element.

public static IEnumerable<T> GetIndexedItems<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, IEnumerable<int> indices)
{
    int currentIndex = -1;
    using (var collectionEnum = collection.GetEnumerator())
    {
        foreach(int index in indices)
        {
            while (collectionEnum.MoveNext()) 
            {
                currentIndex += 1;
                if (currentIndex == index)
                {
                    yield return collectionEnum.Current;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }    
    }
}

Advantages of this solution over other solutions posted:

  • O(1) in extra storage -- some of these solutions are O(n) in space
  • O(n) in time -- some of these solutions are quadradic in time
  • works on any two sequences; does not require ICollection or IList.
  • only iterates the collection once; some solutions iterate the collection multiple times (to build a list out of it, for instance.)

Disadvantages:

  • harder to read
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for thoroughness –  Bob Jun 19 '09 at 15:46
    
Looks very similar to my solution, too. Why did you choose to enumerate over the indexes in the outer loop? –  tanascius Jun 19 '09 at 15:51
2  
Your solution takes advantage of the fact that the indexes are in a list; mine does not. If you start from the premise that the indexes are in an indexable list and the collection is a not-indexable seqeunce, then it makes sense to have your outer loop go over the collection and use an index to "enumerate" the list. But if you start from the premise that both are not-indexable sequences then from a control-flow perspective it doesn't matter which loop "goes outside" the other. –  Eric Lippert Jun 19 '09 at 16:14
2  
But there is another aspect as well. In your solution, you have a "meta index" -- the reader of the code is required to understand that the indexesIndex is an INDEX into a LIST OF INDEXES, which is a potentially confusing "level mixture". In my solution I chose to ensure that the "index" stuck in currentIndex actually is an index into the collection, not an index into the indexes into the collection. It's a subtle point, but I think a good one. –  Eric Lippert Jun 19 '09 at 16:16
5  
Why anyone thinks that "a++; if (a == b)" is somehow harder to read than "if (++a == b)" is beyond me. I have two logical operations -- an incrementing side effect and a conditional goto. It makes it more confusing to combine them into one statement than to make them separate statements. Each statement should have ONE TASK. not TWO. –  Eric Lippert Jun 21 '09 at 22:02

Here's a faster version:

IEnumerable<T> ByIndices<T>(ICollection<T> data, IList<int> indices)
{
    int current = 0;
    foreach(var datum in data.Select((x, i) => new { Value = x, Index = i }))
    {
        if(datum.Index == indices[current])
        {
            yield return datum.Value;
            if(++current == indices.Count)
                yield break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Only works correctly when the index list is sorted, but that's part of the spec so you get an upvote ;) –  LukeH Jun 19 '09 at 15:27
    
Yep -- without the index list being sorted there's probably not any way to do this fast without either sorting it or making a copy of the collection. –  mquander Jun 19 '09 at 15:29
    
Very similar to my version ... beside the .Select and auto-indexing. I wonder which version is more performant. –  tanascius Jun 19 '09 at 15:35
    
Probably yours is. In my experience there's usually a little bit of overhead to LINQ IEnumerable twiddling as opposed to the "functionally equivalent" imperative code. –  mquander Jun 19 '09 at 15:40

Not sure how elegant this is, but here you go.

Since ICollection<> doesn't give you indexing I just used IEnumerable<>, and since I didn't need the index on the IList<> I used IEnumerable<> there too.

public static IEnumerable<T> IndexedLookup<T>(
    IEnumerable<int> indexes, IEnumerable<T> items)
{
    using (var indexesEnum = indexes.GetEnumerator())
    using (var itemsEnum = items.GetEnumerator())
    {
        int currentIndex = -1;
        while (indexesEnum.MoveNext())
        {
            while (currentIndex != indexesEnum.Current)
            {
                if (!itemsEnum.MoveNext())
                    yield break;
                currentIndex++;
            }

            yield return itemsEnum.Current;
        }
    }
}

EDIT: Just noticed my solution is similar to Erics.

share|improve this answer
    
Great minds think alike. And fools do not differ. :-) –  Eric Lippert Jun 19 '09 at 16:18

I would use an extension Method

public static IEnumerable<T> Filter<T>(this IEnumerable<T> pSeq, 
                                       params int [] pIndexes)
{
      return pSeq.Where((pArg, pId) => pIndexes.Contains(pId));
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the use of params –  David Basarab Jun 19 '09 at 15:07
    
+1 for concision, but -1 for inefficiency. –  mquander Jun 19 '09 at 15:09
2  
First off, the indexes are in a list, not an array. Second, this is extremely inefficient if the list of indexes is long. –  Eric Lippert Jun 19 '09 at 15:11
    
A usual with .Contains, don't do this if you don't know how many indexes there will be in the collection. Or you'll go the O(n^2) way the hard way. If you want to be on the safe side, you should use a intermediary Lookup/Dictionary/Hashset and test on this collection and not on the vanilla list (linear search is not good for you) –  Yann Schwartz Jun 19 '09 at 15:13
    
My solution offers a faster answer. –  mquander Jun 19 '09 at 15:15

You could do it in an extension method:

static IEnumerable<T> Extract<T>(this ICollection<T> collection, IList<int> indexes)
{
   int index = 0;
   foreach(var item in collection)
   {
     if (indexes.Contains(index))
       yield item;
     index++;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If elegant means "easy to understand" this wins... However, if index list is large, Contains() will hurt performance. –  dbkk Jun 19 '09 at 16:03
    
all you use is Contains on the indexes, so better to loosen up by accepting an IEnumerable<int>. –  nawfal Jul 8 at 14:26

Not elegant, but efficient - make sure indexes are sorted ...

ICollection<T> selected = new Collection<T>();
var indexesIndex = 0;
var collectionIndex = 0;
foreach( var item in collection )
{
    if( indexes[indexesIndex] != collectionIndex++ )
    {
    	continue;
    }
    selected.Add( item );
    if( ++indexesIndex == indexes.Count )
    {
    	break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

As a proper answer :

var col = new []{"a","b","c"};
var ints = new []{0,2};
var set = new HashSet<int>(ints);

var result = col.Where((item,index) => set.Contains(index));

A usual with IList.Contains or Enumerable.Contains, don't do lookups in lists if you don't know how many indexes there will be in the collection. Or you'll go the O(n^2) way the hard way. If you want to be on the safe side, you should use a intermediary Lookup/Dictionary/Hashset and test on this collection and not on the vanilla list (linear search is not good for you)

share|improve this answer
    
I like your idea of using Hashset –  Vasu Balakrishnan Jun 19 '09 at 15:29

Several good suggestions here already, I'll just throw in my two cents.

int counter = 0;
var x = collection
    .Where((item, index) => 
        counter < indices.Length && 
        index == indices[counter] && 
        ++counter != 0);

edit: yah, didn't think it through the first time around. the increment has to happen only when the other two conditions are satisfied..

share|improve this answer
    
This might work if the clauses in the condition were the other way around -- as-is, counter will increment even if it doesn't find a result, wreaking havoc. –  mquander Jun 19 '09 at 15:30

I like linq.

    IList<T> list = collection.ToList<T>();

    var result = from i in indexes
                 select list[i];

    return result.ToList<T>();
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah LINQ is not as efficient, but much easier to read. –  Cameron MacFarland Jun 19 '09 at 16:27

I find this solution particualarly elegant and a bit easier to follow.

Solution 1

   public static IEnumerable<T> GetIndexedItems2<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection,    IEnumerable<int> indices) {

        int skipped = 0;
        foreach (int index in indices) {
            int offset = index - skipped;
            collection = collection.Skip(offset);
            skipped += offset;
            yield return collection.First();
        }
    }

This can be refactored farther to a real simple implementation:

Solution 2

   public static IEnumerable<T> GetIndexedItems3<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, IEnumerable<int> indices) {
        foreach (int offset in indices.Distances()) {
            collection = collection.Skip(offset);
            yield return collection.First();
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<int> Distances(this IEnumerable<int> numbers) {
        int offset = 0;
        foreach (var number in numbers) {
            yield return number - offset;
            offset = number;
        }
    }

But we are not done

Due to deferred execution LINQs Skip is way too slow.

   public static IEnumerable<T> GetIndexedItems4<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, IEnumerable<int> indices) {
        var rest = collection.GetEnumerator();
        foreach (int offset in indices.Distances()) {
            Skip(rest, offset);
            yield return rest.Current;
        }
    }

    static void Skip<T>(IEnumerator<T> enumerator, int skip) {
        while (skip > 0) {
            enumerator.MoveNext();
            skip--;
        }
        return;
    }

    static IEnumerable<int> Distances(this IEnumerable<int> numbers) {
        int offset = 0;
        foreach (var number in numbers) {
            yield return number - offset;
            offset = number;
        }
    }

Benchmarking, gives us similar performance to the solution by Eric.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication21 {

    static class LinqExtensions {

        public static IEnumerable<T> GetIndexedItemsEric<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, IEnumerable<int> indices) {
            int currentIndex = -1;
            using (var collectionEnum = collection.GetEnumerator()) {
                foreach (int index in indices) {
                    while (collectionEnum.MoveNext()) {
                        currentIndex += 1;
                        if (currentIndex == index) {
                            yield return collectionEnum.Current;
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        public static IEnumerable<T> GetIndexedItemsSam<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, IEnumerable<int> indices) {
            var rest = collection.GetEnumerator();
            foreach (int offset in indices.Distances()) {
                Skip(rest, offset);
                yield return rest.Current;
            }
        }

        static void Skip<T>(this IEnumerator<T> enumerator, int skip) {
            while (skip > 0) {
                enumerator.MoveNext();
                skip--;
            }
            return;
        }

        static IEnumerable<int> Distances(this IEnumerable<int> numbers) {
            int offset = 0;
            foreach (var number in numbers) {
                yield return number - offset;
                offset = number;
            }
        }
    } 

    class Program {

        static void TimeAction(string description, int iterations, Action func) {
            var watch = new Stopwatch();
            watch.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
                func(); 
            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.Write(description);
            Console.WriteLine(" Time Elapsed {0} ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        }

        static void Main(string[] args) {

            int max = 100000;
            int lookupCount = 1000;
            int iterations = 500;
            var rand = new Random();
            var array = Enumerable.Range(0, max).ToArray();
            var lookups = Enumerable.Range(0, lookupCount).Select(i => rand.Next(max - 1)).Distinct().OrderBy(_ => _).ToArray();

            // warmup 
            array.GetIndexedItemsEric(lookups).ToArray();
            array.GetIndexedItemsSam(lookups).ToArray();

            TimeAction("Eric's Solution", iterations, () => {
                array.GetIndexedItemsEric(lookups).ToArray();
            });

            TimeAction("Sam's Solution", iterations, () =>
            {
                array.GetIndexedItemsEric(lookups).ToArray();
            });

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}
 
Eric's Solution Time Elapsed 770 ms
Sam's Solution Time Elapsed 768 ms
share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget when profiling like this that the first time the code runs takes potentially much longer than the average subsequent times, because the jitter only runs the first time. Failure to consider that fact can massively skew results when the algorithm is fast but the jitter, for whatever reason, has a lot of work to do the first time. If what you are interested in is the marginal cost of each run, rather than the amortized cost overall, then you might consider getting in the habit of doing the first call to "func" outside of the stopwatch timing. –  Eric Lippert Jun 24 '09 at 22:32
    
@Eric, true, I should make TimeAction take care of jitting before timing anything, I did a warmup to ensure most stuff is jitted to work around that. I also tested this in both orders to ensure my results are not skewed, both implementations perform pretty much identically. –  Sam Saffron Jun 24 '09 at 23:55

As I understand it, an ICollection may not necessarily have any order which is why there isn't an extremely elegant solution to access things by index. You many want to consider using a dictionary or list to store the data in the collection.

The best way I can think of is to iterate through the collection while keeping track of what index you are on. Then check if the indexes list contains that index. If so, return that element.

share|improve this answer
    
You contradict yourself. First you say that collections have no order, and then you say "iterate through it". If it's not orderable then it cannot be iterated. Collections are required to have an order because they are required to implement IEnumerable. That order need not be stable under any operation on the collection, but some ordering must exist. The relevant bit is not the ordering, the relevant bit is that collections are not required to have an index operation. –  Eric Lippert Jun 19 '09 at 15:16
    
Your algorithm sketch is unnecessarily inefficient because it does not take advantage of the fact that the index list is already in the right order. Rather than searching the list, take out another iterator to the list, to keep track of what the next target index is. –  Eric Lippert Jun 19 '09 at 15:19
    public static IEnumerable<T> WhereIndexes<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, IEnumerable<int> indexes)
    {
        IList<T> l = new List<T>(collection);
        foreach (var index in indexes)
        {
            yield return l[index]; 
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This algorithm is slightly misleading. At first reading I thought iterating over indexes instead of the list is efficient, but then, copying the list negates the possible benefits. –  dbkk Jun 19 '09 at 16:01

It seems that the most efficient way would be to use a Dictionary<int,T> instead of a Collection<T>. You can still keep a list of indexes you want to use in the IList<int>.

share|improve this answer

Maybe I'm missing something, but what's wrong with just:

indexes.Select( (index => values[index]))
share|improve this answer
    
Collections do not have an [ ] operator. –  Eric Lippert Jun 19 '09 at 16:22
    
values is an ICollection, so it doesn't have an indexed property. –  Cameron MacFarland Jun 19 '09 at 16:25

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