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Am kind confused, am try to the max and min length of the datatype int in my credit card details and telephone but i don't how to.

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Telephone is required")]
    public int Telephone { get; set; }
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Card Type is required")]
    [DisplayName("Card Type")]
    [StringLength(20)]
    public string CardType { get; set; }
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Card Holders Name is required")]
    [DisplayName("Card Holders Name")]
    [StringLength(160)]
    public string CardHoldersName { get; set; }
    public int CardNumber { get; set; }
    public int CardExpMonth { get; set; }
    public int CardExpYear { get; set; }
    [ScaffoldColumn(false)]
    public decimal Total;
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1  
Have you looked into the fun that is PCI compliance? Most people should't be storing CC data, at all. –  ceejayoz Apr 17 '12 at 2:38

3 Answers 3

Why are you storing the card number in an integer? Isn't a string more appropriate?

A string can handle any cc number you need. It could also handle (for further processing) cases where the user enters spaces between digits.

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if i store it string how do i make sure that the user enters numbers only and 16 numbers only –  user1335443 Apr 17 '12 at 2:41
1  
@user1335443 with validation :) –  Matt Ball Apr 17 '12 at 2:42
2  
You have a few choices. Perhaps the best is to use a RegEx validator that verifies these things. Also note that not all credit card numbers are 16 digits. –  Jonathan Wood Apr 17 '12 at 2:42
    
@ MДΓΓ БДLL more specif please –  user1335443 Apr 17 '12 at 2:43
2  
This is not an appropriate forum for describing all the details of MVC validators. Google asp.net mvc regex validator if you're interested. –  Jonathan Wood Apr 17 '12 at 2:49

If you're going to store the CardNumber in a numeric format, use a long. A 32-bit signed int's max value is 2,147,483,647 — remember, int is synonymous with System.Int32 — which is not remotely large enough to hold a 16-digit credit card number. A long (aka System.Int64) has max value of 9,223,372,036,854,775,807, so it can hold every 18-digit number.

Note that a uint (unsigned 32-bit integer) is still not large enough, since its max value is merely 4,294,967,295.

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use BigInteger Structure available in namespace System.Numerics

I think this would be useful to you

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.numerics.biginteger.aspx

working with incredibly large numbers in .NET

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/2728/C-BigInteger-Class

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