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This question is prob a duplicate (but I can't find it) so I apologize if it's redundant. I am trying to use JQuery's .remove function to allow for removing (obviously) of li elements in my static HTML prototype. Rather than write out a javascript block for each li I want to remove I was wondering if it was possible to create incrementing IDs with JS alone. (I'm using Serve with HAML and SASS fyi). Here is what I have.

/view-file.html.haml

%ul
  %li#removeThis1
    %a.remover1{:src => "#"} Remove

/application.js

...
$(".remover1").click(function () {
  $("li#removeThis1").fadeOut( function() { $(this).remove(); });
});

Any thoughts on how to increment .remover1 to .remover2, etc? Likewise li##removeThis1 to #removeThis2, etc.

I would need all this to happen on page load.

share|improve this question
2  
possible duplicate of jquery create a unique id –  Matt Ball Apr 17 '12 at 3:31
    
Can you show the generated HTML so people that don't know haml can offer some help? –  jfriend00 Apr 17 '12 at 3:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's an ancestral relationship between the elements, so just use that to your advantage.

  // don't bother numbering the class. Use a common class
$(".remover").click(function () {

       // find the closest ancestor with an ID that start with "removeThis"
    $(this).closest("li[id^=removeThis]")
           .fadeOut( function() { $(this).remove(); });
});

Or if you don't really need an ID on the ancestor, use a class there too...

  // don't bother numbering the class. Use a common class
$(".remover").click(function () {

       // find the closest ancestor with the class "removeThis"
    $(this).closest(".removeThis")
           .fadeOut( function() { $(this).remove(); });
});

Ultimately, if you were to use IDs, you'd want to generate them on the server side, then extract the numeric portion of the ID from the element with the handler, and concatenate it into the selector for the ancestor.

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Just curious, why do you flag most of your answers as "community wiki"? :o –  SiGanteng Apr 17 '12 at 3:36
    
@NiftyDude: Mostly because I don't like/want rep points. But also so that others feel more comfortable adding value/making corrections if they wish. –  squint Apr 17 '12 at 3:39
1  
that's very nice of you :) –  SiGanteng Apr 17 '12 at 3:39
1  
Awesome. Worked like a charm. –  bgadoci Apr 17 '12 at 3:46

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