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Okay so here is the gist of what's happening:

I am passing in a character array (char[x]) into a function, whose argument is defined to be a character pointer (char *). Once inside the function I assign another character pointer (which is a part of a struct I have). I get a segmentation fault as soon as I assign the incoming argument, to the structure's character pointer; as such.

temp->name = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char));
temp->name = name;

This is how I've been utilizing the function previously:

char *name = "HEY";
Function(name);

Here's how I am utilizing it with errors:

char name[3] = "HEY";
Function(name);

with the same statement above, and it works fine. I made sure it wasn't anything else, by changing name to a constant "HEY", with the same input and everything went smoothly.

If anybody can think of a reason why off the top of their head, I would greatly appreciate the help. Thank you!

Here's the function in full:

  • openList is the pointer to the beginning of a linked list of structs
  • tempOpen is a temporary pointer we can utilize to scour through the list, without altering the openList position
  • findOpenSetSID/findItem -> looks for a struct in the linked list via the SID/key
  • answerOpen/answerItem -> 1 == first node, 2 == any other node, 0 = not found

Here is a breif summary of the structures involved. The open structure is a linked list of pointers to another structure (called set structures) A set structure is a linked list of names, sid's, and a item structure An item structure is a linked list of data and keys

Error_t WRITE(Sid_t sid, char *key, char *data){

 Open_p_t tempOpen = openList;      //setting a pointer to a struct 
 int answerOpen = findOpenSetSID(sid, &tempOpen);   
 if(answerOpen > 0){
    Set_p_t targetNode;             
    if(answerOpen == 1){
        targetNode = tempOpen->file;        
    }
    else{
        targetNode= tempOpen->next->file;   
    }
    Item_p_t tempItem = targetNode->items;      
    int answerItem = findItem(key, &tempItem);  
    Item_p_t targetItem;                
    targetItem = (Item_p_t)malloc(sizeof(Item_t));
    if(answerItem > 0){
        if(answerItem == 1){
            targetItem = targetNode->items;
        }
        else{
            targetItem = targetNode->items->next;
        }
        targetItem->data = data;        
    }
    else{
        **targetItem->data = data;**      <<<The problem line.
                                                      basically I am just adding   
                                                      items to my sets. But this line 
                                                      freaks out when the input changes 
                                                      from char* to char[]
        targetItem->key = key;

        targetItem->next = targetNode->items;
        targetNode->items = targetItem;
    }
    return 0;
}
return 1;
}

Here's the input segment:

char key[32], data[64]; // reads in data using fscanf(fd, "%s %s", key data) then calls WRITE(setId, key, data);

share|improve this question
    
Please show code that demonstrates the problem. A description is often confusing or misleading. –  Michael Burr Apr 17 '12 at 5:41
4  
I don't know why you're getting a segfault (you haven't shown enough code to guess), but your double assignment of temp->name reveals a fundamental misunderstanding of C memory management. –  Greg Hewgill Apr 17 '12 at 5:41
    
It looks like you should be using strcpy instead of temp->name = name; (though 1 char wouldn't make sense) unless you're actually trying to copy the pointer and not string (in which case you've probably created a memory leak). –  Corbin Apr 17 '12 at 5:41
    
Never typecast the result of malloc. Read this and this. –  Lundin Apr 17 '12 at 6:44

3 Answers 3

Firstly, these two lines:

temp->name = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char));
temp->name = name;

The top line is useless and will cause a memory leak.

Secondly, these two lines:

char *name = "HEY";
char name[3] = "HEY";

are close but not identical. The first results in name pointing to a 4-byte chunk of data with the string "HEY" and a null terminator (value 0 or '\0') at the end. The second results in name pointing to a 3-byte chunk of memory with the bytes "HEY" and no null terminator.

If your function assumes that it is getting a null-terminated string (more than likely), then the second variant will probably cause a segfault.

share|improve this answer
    
Gotcha, thanks I wasn't really sure about when to use malloc. Especially for structures that have char* within them. How would one assign a char* to char name[x]?? Is there a way to append a NULL byte to the array? –  user1166155 Apr 17 '12 at 5:58
    
What do you actually want to achieve? malloc allocates memory from the heap. You need free memory you malloc'd. String literals like "abc" are located in read-only memory, like code. You can read them using a const char * but you can't modify their contents. char c[100] are arrays, not pointers. You can use pointers into such arrays. Auto variables of this type reside on the stack while struct fields of this type reside within the struct, where ever it is: stack or heap (malloc'd memory) or read only memory (static const variables). Tell us what you actually want. –  Z.T. Apr 17 '12 at 6:07
    
I imagined that I needed to allocate memory space for any pointer assignments. I think I'm mixing up how to allocate memory for pointers to pointers... I really just want to assign this input (char[x]) that's coming in the argument (defined as char *), to another variable in my structure (char *) –  user1166155 Apr 17 '12 at 6:12
    
You can't "assign" arrays in C. If you want to copy bytes from read-only (like string literals) into modifiable memory, you need to use strcpy or memcpy (depending on whether you know the length). The destination must have been allocated to hold the data you wish to copy into it. –  Z.T. Apr 17 '12 at 6:13
    
if you have a struct string_t { const char *c; int length; }; and you have a variable s of type struct string_t, this variable has enough space for a pointer and an int. You can assign a pointer to s.c: struct string_t s; s.c = "abc"; s takes up 8 bytes on 32bit arch, resides on the stack, is modifiable and ceases to exist when it goes out of scope. The contents pointed to by c is read-only. –  Z.T. Apr 17 '12 at 6:16

Not sure from the sniplet as to how temp->name is declared, however the problem is probably here;

 name = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char));

As size of char is only one byte, and depending on what you want to store, you either need the space for a full pointer (4 or 8 bytes), or a sequence of chars if you expect to copy content into the allocated space;

So

 name = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char *));

Or

 name = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 80 ); // for 80 bytes char array
share|improve this answer

So let's start at the beginning. You read key,data pairs of strings from a file. You build a linked list of those pairs in the order you've read them. Then what?

/*
compile with:
gcc -std=c89 -pedantic -Wall -O2 -o so_10185705 so_10185705.c
test with:
valgrind ./so_10185705
*/
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct node_t {
  char key[32];
  char value[64];
  struct node_t *next;
};

static void print_list(const struct node_t *curr)
{
  while (curr) {
    printf("%s, %s\n", curr->key, curr->value);
    curr = curr->next;
  }
}

static void free_list(struct node_t **currp)
{
  struct node_t *curr = *currp;
  *currp = NULL; /* don't leave dangling pointers */
  while (curr) {
    struct node_t *next = curr->next;
    curr->next = NULL;
    free((void *)curr);
    curr = next;
  }
}

/* O(n) but useful */
static const struct node_t *
find_in_list(const struct node_t *curr, const char *key)
{
  while (curr) {
    if (!strncmp(curr->key, key, sizeof(curr->key)))
      return curr;
    curr = curr->next;
  }
  return NULL;
}

/* Same as find_in_list but less useful */
static int is_in_list(const struct node_t *curr, const char *key)
{
  while (curr) {
    if (!strncmp(curr->key, key, sizeof(curr->key)))
      return 1;
    curr = curr->next;
  }
  return 0;
}

int main()
{
  struct node_t *head = NULL;
  FILE *f = fopen("foo", "r");
  if (!f) exit(1);
  while (!feof(f)) {
    struct node_t *new_node = malloc(sizeof(struct node_t));
    fscanf(f, "%s %s", new_node->key, new_node->value);
    new_node->next = head;
    head = new_node;
  }
  fclose(f);
  print_list(head);
  const struct node_t *node = find_in_list(head, "abcd2");
  if (node) {
    printf("found! key = %s, value = %s\n", node->key, node->value);
  } else {
    printf("not found!\n");
  }
  if (is_in_list(head, "abcd3")) {
    printf("found key in list but now I don't know the value associated with this key.\n");
  } else {
    printf("not found!\n");
  }
  free_list(&head);
  return 0;
}

/* explanation of bugs in OP's code */

struct node_t_2 {
  char *key;
  char *value;
  struct node_t_2 *next;
};

void build_list(FILE *f, struct node_t_2 *curr)
{
  while (!feof(f)) {
    /*
    These variable are allocated on the stack.
    Their lifetime is limited to the current scope.
    At the closing curly brace of the block in which they are declared,
    they die, the information in them is lost and pointer to them become
    invalid garbage.
    */
    key char[32];
    value char[64];
    /*
    Of course, you can only read keys up to 31 bytes long and values up to 63 bytes long.
    Because you need an extra byte for the string's NUL terminator.
    fscanf puts that NUL terminator for you.
    If it didn't, you would not be able to use the data:
     you would not know the lenth of the string.
    If you need 32-byte long keys, declare the variable key to be 33 bytes long.
    */
    fscanf(f, "%s %s", key, value);
    /* You can use key and value here */
    struct node_t_2 bad_new_node;
    /*
    You cannot add bad_new_node to the list, because as soon as you
    reach '}' it will die.
    You need a place for the node that will not disappear
     (be reused on the next iteration of the loop).
    So it must be on the heap.
    How many bytes do you need for the node? Enough to hold the three pointers:
     12 bytes on 32bit, 24 bytes on 64bit.
    The compiler knows how many bytes a struct needs.
    */
    struct node_t_2 *new_node = malloc(sizeof(struct node_t_2));
    /*
    You can add new_node to the list, because it is on the heap and will
     exist until either passed to free() or the process (program) exits.
    */
    new_node->key = key;
    new_node->value = value;
    /*
    That was a bug, because we stored pointers to garbage.
    Now new_node has a pointer to a place that will cease to exist
    as soon as we reach '}'.
    */
    new_node->key = strdup(key);
    new_node->value = strdup(value);
    /*
    strdup is a standard function that can be implemented like this:
    char * strdup(const char *s)
    {
      int len = strlen(s)
      char *p = malloc(len);
      memcpy(p, s, len);
      return p;
    }
    Now new_node has pointers to memory on the heap that will continue to
    exist until passed to free or the process terminates.
    */
    new_node->next = curr;
    curr = new_node;
    /*
    At the next line, memory for key and value is disappears and
     is re-used if we re-enter the loop.
    */
  }
}

/*
If your list nodes have pointers instead of arrays, you need to free
the strings pointed to by those pointers manually, becuause freeing
the list node wont free stuff it points to.
*/
free_list(struct node_t_2 **currp)
{
  struct node_t_2 *curr = *currp;
  *currp = NULL;
  while (curr) {
    struct node_t_2 *next = curr->next;
    free((void *)curr->key);
    curr->key = NULL;
    free((void *)curr->value);
    curr->value = NULL;
    curr->next = NULL;
    free((void *)curr);
    curr = next;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well where I was having a problem was the reading in part and making the list. fscanf(f, "%s %s", new_node->key, new_node->value); //right here instead of this, it was more like char key[32], data[64]; fscanf(f, "%s %s", key, data); //then in the function somewhere else I was creating the node by assigning func(char key, char *data){ new_node->key = key; However I tried the strcpy as suggested, and am now doing this. input is still char key[32]; func(char key, char* data) new_node->key = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)); strcpy(new_node->key, key); –  user1166155 Apr 17 '12 at 7:27
    
You're doing it wrong, because you do not understand what memory management is, or what stack and heap are. Tag this question as homework. –  Z.T. Apr 17 '12 at 7:58
    
There is almost never a reason to malloc(sizeof(char)). Why would you allocate a single byte of memory? You read 32 bytes from a file and you copy 32 bytes into a space which can hold 1 byte. Why do you think this can ever work? "Give me a bottle that holds 1 liter of water. Now pour 32 liters of water into this bottle". Do you understand? You spill over 31 liters of water on the floor. It overflows stuff around the single bottle. Then your program crashes, because you overwrote pointers with garbage. –  Z.T. Apr 17 '12 at 8:30

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