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Is it possible to do something like what's happening here in the where statement @Age param?

 @AGE Varchar(8)

 SELECT NAME FROM TABLE WHERE 
 (
 If @AGE='man'
  then (AGE = 'man' or AGE = 'boy')
  else (AGE = 'man')
 )
 AND City IS NULL
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4  
AGE='man' OR (@AGE='MAN' and AGE='boy')? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 17 '12 at 7:09
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: I don't think it's as simple as that e.g. consider that when @AGE = 'man' and AGE = 'boy' the OP's search condition is TRUE whereas yours is FALSE. – –  onedaywhen Apr 17 '12 at 8:04
    
@onedaywhen: Why, it would be True. First comparison yields False, second and third yield True. The conjunction of the last two yields True as well, and the disjunction of False and True is, again, True. –  Andriy M Apr 17 '12 at 9:37
    
@AndriyM: Not sure what you mean by first, second and third. For the values in the case I gave, If @AGE='man' then (AGE = 'man' or AGE = 'boy') would evaluate TRUE and the ELSE condition would not be tested. –  onedaywhen Apr 17 '12 at 10:20
    
@AndriyM: ...I've added some test code to my answer. –  onedaywhen Apr 17 '12 at 10:26
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, something like this:

SELECT NAME FROM TABLE WHERE 
((@AGE='man'
   AND (AGE = 'man' or AGE = 'boy'))
OR
(@AGE <> 'man'
  AND (AGE = 'man')))
AND City IS NULL

Note the condition @AGE <> 'man'may need to be tweaked depending on whether the @AGE variable can be null.

I answered a very similar question here.

This is a very common technique in a WHERE clause. If you want to apply some "IF" logic in the WHERE clause all you need to do is add the extra condition with an boolean AND to the section where it needs to be applied.

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one way of doing this is with EXEC and build the String command by If's.

something like this :

declare @t nvarchar(max)
@AGE Varchar(8)
set @t=' SELECT NAME FROM TABLE WHERE '


 If @AGE='man' set @t=@t+'(AGE = ''man'' or AGE = ''boy'')'
  else  set @t=@t+'(AGE = 'man')'

set @t=@t+' AND City IS NULL'
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In conjunctive normal form ("a series of ANDs", less dependent on parans):

SELECT * 
  FROM TABLE
 WHERE ( @AGE <> 'man' OR (AGE IN ('man', 'boy') ) )
       AND ( @AGE = 'man' OR AGE = 'man' )
       AND CITY IS NULL;

The idea here is to use the implication rewrite rule:

( IF x THEN y )  is equivalent to  ( NOT ( x ) OR y )

Here's some test code:

WITH T 
     AS
     (
      SELECT * 
        FROM (
              VALUES (1, 'man', NULL), 
                     (2, 'boy', NULL), 
                     (3, 'girl', NULL)
             ) AS T (NAME, AGE, CITY)
     ),
     Params
     AS
     (
      SELECT * 
        FROM (
              VALUES ('man'), 
                     ('boy'), 
                     ('girl')
             ) AS T (p_AGE)
     ), 
     Results
     AS
     (
      SELECT Params.*, T.*, 
             CASE WHEN     ( ( p_AGE <> 'man' OR (AGE IN ('man', 'boy') ) ) AND ( p_AGE = 'man' OR AGE = 'man' ) )  THEN 'TRUE'
                  WHEN NOT ( ( p_AGE <> 'man' OR (AGE IN ('man', 'boy') ) ) AND ( p_AGE = 'man' OR AGE = 'man' ) )  THEN 'FALSE'
                  ELSE 'UNKNOWN' 
             END AS result_onedaywhen, 
             CASE WHEN     ( AGE='man' OR (p_AGE='MAN' and AGE='boy') )  THEN 'TRUE'
                  WHEN NOT ( AGE='man' OR (p_AGE='MAN' and AGE='boy') )  THEN 'FALSE'
                  ELSE 'UNKNOWN' 
             END AS result_Damien_The_Unbeliever
        FROM T, Params
     )
SELECT * 
  FROM Results;
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OR you could use decode functions

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1  
Question is tagged sql-server. DECODE doesn't exist on SQL Server. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 17 '12 at 7:32
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