Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to read from a file and add some items to a string based on their regular expression pattern. I am facing some issues while doing it. So, I wrote the following basic code.

#!/usr/local/bin/perl
#Regex example
#Author: Sidartha Karna
use warnings;
use strict;

my @temp = ('adasd\\',  'bbbb', 'cccc');

foreach(@temp){
   next unless /(.*)\\?/;
   print "$_|$1\n" if defined $1;     
}

I want only the part of string other than the character '\' if it is available. So I added ? before the preceeding character ie '\'. The following is the output:

adasd\|adasd\
bbbb|bbbb
cccc|cccc

The first element still has \ present. I could not determine the issue in this regular expression. Is it related to greedy/non-greedy matching? How can this regular expression be corrected to find the correct output?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The .* in the regular expression will greedily match all the input, including the last backslash, leaving an empty string to match \\?.

Using a non-greedy match is an easy fix: /^(.*?)\\?$/

Update: Now anchors are needed to prevent the whole expression from matching an empty string.

share|improve this answer
1  
this will match nothing because in abc there is nothing between a and b and \\? will match that nothing. –  shift66 Apr 17 '12 at 7:21
    
Getting completely blank for the first string. –  Sid Apr 17 '12 at 7:22
    
You are right. Updated to include the anchors needed to prevent this from happening. –  Joni Apr 17 '12 at 7:27
    
thank you "Joni Salonen" –  Sid Apr 17 '12 at 8:14
add comment

Ok, so my perl-fu is a little rusty, but I think the issue you have is that the kleene star is greedy and that . matches anything. Since . will match anything, literally anything it matches the \ before the \\? but since the \\ is made optional, the regex still matches.

What you want is /(.*?)\\?/. Basically the *? makes the Kleene star lazy.

Though technically what you want is /([^\\]*)\\?/ which matches anything that isn't a \ This pattern is generally considered to be a better way of doing it, since it is bit nicer to the regex engine. (The first way forces it to check the rest of the regex after each match on ., the second way allows it to march blindly forward until \)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this

my @temp = ( 'adasd\\', 'bbbb', 'cccc' );

foreach (@temp) {
    next unless /((?:(?!\\$).)*)/;
    print "$_|$1\n" if defined $1;
}

(?:(?!\\$).)* will match the next character only if it is not a backslash followed by the end of the string. This assertion is enforced by the negative lookahead assertion (?!\\$)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try Character class like

use warnings; 
use strict;  
my @temp = ('adasd\\',  'bbbb', 'cccc'); 

foreach(@temp){  
    next unless /([^\\]+)\\?/;    
    print "$_|$1\n" if defined $1;      
} 

Output:

adasd\|adasd
bbbb|bbbb
cccc|cccc
share|improve this answer
add comment

if you want all characters before the first slash (\) use this pattern:

(.*?)\\

The pattern you wrote means everything until the last slash or nothing because \\? means slash OR nothing. It's a greedy pattern so it will match nothing. That's why you're getting the whole string as output.

EDIT:

Sorry I missed that slash is optional. Use this (.*?)(\\|$)
$ means end of the line. (\\|$) means slash or end of the line so your pattern will try to find the first slash. If couldn't it will match the end of the line.

share|improve this answer
    
And if theres no slash, this wont match –  Aatch Apr 17 '12 at 7:16
    
But '\' character at the end is optional. So, with this, the other two strings will not be matched. –  Sid Apr 17 '12 at 7:18
    
@Sid, I edited my answer, please take a look –  shift66 Apr 17 '12 at 7:23
    
The question-mark in (.*)? is not needed because .* can already match an empty string. Or am I missing something? –  Joni Apr 17 '12 at 7:29
    
@JoniSalonen yes, you're missing. for abc\\ string this patern (.*)?(\\|$) will get "abs" in group 1 and this one (.*)(\\|$) will get abc\ because it will try to match till the last slash or end of the line. And the last is the end of the line. –  shift66 Apr 17 '12 at 7:33
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.