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Hi I am putting together my website and whilst it is very simple I decided to test as many aspects of it as I could. Using the ethos of only writing useful tests that could account for situations I could imagine happening (renaming of a script or css file etc)

I am using Steve Sanderson's MVC Integration testing framework and my tests are below.

My question is two fold, is this level of testing "too much" and if not, what other scenarios (either developer related such as renaming or anything else) can you think of.

using System.Web;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using MvcIntegrationTestFramework.Hosting;
using NUnit.Framework;
using website.Properties;

namespace website.tests
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class HomeControllerIndexTests
    {
        [TestFixtureSetUp]
        public void Setup()
        {
            appHost = AppHost.Simulate("Website");
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexReturnsTheIndexView()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                Assert.AreEqual("Index", ((ViewResult)result.ActionExecutedContext.Result).ViewName);
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexReturnsCorrectRouteData()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                Assert.AreEqual("Home", result.ActionExecutedContext.RouteData.Values["controller"]);
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexReturnsViewResult()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                Assert.IsInstanceOf(typeof(ViewResult), result.ActionExecutedContext.Result);
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexReturnsNoError()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                Assert.IsNull(result.ResultExecutedContext.Exception);
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexReturnsViewWithSiteCssFile()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                Assert.IsTrue(result.ResponseText.Contains("/Content/Site.css"));
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexReturnsViewWithCorrectTitle()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                Assert.IsTrue(result.ResponseText.ToLowerInvariant().Contains("<title>{ me: danielelliott.info(); }</title>"));
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexReturnsViewContainingBanner()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                var expected = HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(Resources.SiteName);
                Assert.IsTrue(result.ResponseText.Contains(expected));
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexViewIncludesBioParagraph()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                var expected = HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(Resources.Bio.ToLowerInvariant());
                Assert.IsTrue(result.ResponseText.ToLowerInvariant().Contains(expected));
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexViewIncludesServicesParagraph()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                var expected = HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(Resources.Services.ToLowerInvariant());
                Assert.IsTrue(result.ResponseText.ToLowerInvariant().Contains(expected));
            });
        }

        [Test]
        public void HomeControllerIndexViewIncludesHistoryParagraph()
        {
            appHost.Start(session =>
            {
                var result = session.Get("/Home/Index");
                var expected = HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(Resources.History.ToLowerInvariant());
                Assert.IsTrue(result.ResponseText.ToLowerInvariant().Contains(expected));
            });
        }

        private AppHost appHost;
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

Testing is always context dependent and the risks that you see should guide the amount of testing.

  • How critical it would be if some part is not working after some change?
  • Do you believe that these parts could break when something is changed?
  • How big task it would be to maintain these tests if the structure of the page would change?
  • Do you believe these parts will change often? Does it pay off to automate them?
  • How long will running the tests take when the amount grows? Are you ready to wait that time often to see that latest changes have not broken anything?

If the page is not changing very often, this amount seems like quite much. You can also think if it would be enough to test just a sample of things. For example, it seems that you are including multiple parts to the page. If they are coming from same location and are included with the same mechanism, it seems unlikely that including one would fail if others are there.

On the other hand, it is always easier to reduce the amount. You can start with this when learning and then see if you need to change the approach later.

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My reaction when I see your tests is that they mostly verify implementation details. I would recommend that you focus on behavior. Test the end user's interactions with the site. Verify that information is present, not how it is presented.

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I did try to point out these were integration tests. Agree wholeheartedly re: testing behaviours in unit tests! –  Daniel Elliott Apr 17 '12 at 10:11

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