Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

sample code given below is not compiled in g++. but it's working on visual studio. is it possible to use Template member function inside template class in g++

class Impl
{
public:
        template<class I>
        void Foo(I* i)
        {

        }
};

template<class C>
class D
{
public:
        C c;
        void Bar()
        {
                int t = 0;
                c.Foo<int>(&t);
        }
};

int main()
{
        D<Impl> d;
        d.Bar();
        return 0;
}
share|improve this question
5  
What are the errors you are seeing? –  Nick Apr 17 '12 at 7:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Because the statement in question depends on a template parameter, the compiler is not allowed to introspect C until instantiation. You must tell it that you mean a function template:

c.template Foo<int>(&t);

If you don't put template there, the statement is ambiguous. For understanding, imagine the following C:

class C { const int Foo = 5; }; 
...
c.Foo<int>(&t);

It looks to the compiler as if you compare a const int to an int, and comparing the result of that to some adress of &t: (c.Foo<int) > &t.

The real solution however is to omit the explicit template argument in the function call, and just do:

c.Foo(&t);

This is correct even in the case where such a C has a non-template member function Foo(int). Generally, write template code with as few assumptions as possible (but not less).

share|improve this answer

Foo() is a template-dependent name, so you need to put template in front of the invocation:

template<class C>
void D<C>::Bar()
{
    int t = 0;
    c.template Foo(&t);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks.it's working. –  nsa Apr 17 '12 at 7:44
    
You can also leave out <int>, resulting in c.Foo(&t). That should work as well. –  evnu Apr 17 '12 at 7:44
    
@evnu Yes to leaving out the <int> (as I did in my answer), no to leaving out the template (as you did in your comment). –  Michael Wild Apr 17 '12 at 7:46
    
@nsa BTW, if the answer is satisfactory to you, please accept it by checking the tick-mark. –  Michael Wild Apr 17 '12 at 7:46
1  
Another point: The version where you omit template will be correct even if c.Foo() is not a template, which is why I'd prefer it. –  phresnel Apr 17 '12 at 8:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.