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I have a simple struct:

typedef struct {
    int width, height;
    unsigned char *pixels;
} image;

Which one is the better API?

image *imagecreate(int w, int h) {
    image *img = malloc(sizeof(image));
    img->width = w;
    img->height = h;
    img->pixels = calloc(w * h, 3);
    return img;
}

void imagefree(image *img) {
    free(img->pixels);
    free(img);
}

or

image imagecreate(int w, int h) {
    image img;  
    img.width = w;
    img.height = h;
    img.pixels = calloc(w * h, 3);
    return img;
}

void imagefree(image *img) {
    free(img->pixels);
    img->width = img->height = 0;
}

?

It seems to be overkill to do an additional malloc() for such a small struct which is only a wrapper around a pointer to the real dynamically allocated data. But on the other hand it feels unnatural (to me) to hide a pointer to dynamically allocated memory inside a value type. One could think that you don't have to free it.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're talking about API. So it's crucial that it should be easy for your clients to use correctly and hard to use incorrectly.

A small improve on option #2

For example, if I'm the user of your second API:

image imagecreate(int w, int h);
void imagefree(image *img);

I probably won't even notice the need to call imagefree because imagecreate returns an object, not a pointer to an object, while imagefree needs a pointer. I may think that imagefree is only a wrapper of delete image for a heap allocated object. So I won't use it for a "stack" object.

Therefore, this is better:

image imagecreate(int w, int h);
void imagefree(image img);

While you have a heap-allocated member inside image, but you hide it in these APIs which is good. And they have consistent "lookings" which is better, and less error-prone.

So what about option #1?

As to your first option, is that even better? That depends (on individuals). As to me, I perfer option #1.

image *imagecreate(int w, int h);
void imagefree(image *img);

Why?

Although we don't have a way to enforce the resource auto destruction by destructor like RAII in C++, usually more attention is paid for C programmers who see a "pointer" returned from an API(we are sensitive to pointers, aren't we? ;). It's much likely that they keep asking themselves: is it dynamicly allocated inside imagecreate? Do I need deallocate it via some other API?

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You convinced me. I'll probably go with the pointer return value version. –  ChrG Apr 17 '12 at 11:59
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The difference is that your struct is allocated dynamically in the first case and automatically in the second. That's a matter of personal preference, coding standards and opinion. Second way seems safer to me because its one less free to remember to do, but since you've got to free anyway - doesn't really matter all that much.

Note that in the second case the struct is copied into the return value. You seem to be dealing with the pointer in it well, but its a potential landmine right there.

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i will certainly prefer the first one, pointers are easier to manage in my opinion. –  Aftnix Apr 17 '12 at 10:10
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i would go with the first. assume you have a descriptor'char name[100]' in your struct, your second would use 100byte of stackspace, which must be handled by the operating system, whereas the first memory my be handled by yourself (using a selfwritten garbage collector instead of the standard malloc) and you can move the handle to the object around as you please without having to take care of your limitied stack space.

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I usually manage strings as char *. But you're right, if my struct should grow in the future I would waste more stack space. –  ChrG Apr 17 '12 at 11:56
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