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Here's what I came up with:

solveRPNWrapper :: (Read a, Integral a) => String -> a
solveRPNWrapper str = solveRPN [] $ words str

calcFunction :: String -> String -> String -> String
calcFunction "+" x y = show $ read x + read y
calcFunction "-" x y = show $ read x - read y
calcFunction "*" x y = show $ read x * read y
calcFunction "/" x y = show $ read x / read y
calcFunction op x y = error $ "Unknown operator: " ++ op ++ "."

isOperator :: String -> Bool
isOperator "+" = True
isOperator "-" = True
isOperator "*" = True
isOperator "/" = True
isOperator _ = False

solveRPN :: (Read a, Integral a) => [String] -> [String] -> a
solveRPN [] (x:[]) = read x
solveRPN [] (x:y:xs) = solveRPN (x:y:[]) xs
solveRPN stack (x:xs)
         | isOperator x =
           let z = calcFunction x (last (init stack)) (last stack)
           in solveRPN (init (init stack)) (z:xs)
         | otherwise = solveRPN (stack ++ [x]) xs
solveRPN stack [] = error $ "Badly formatted expression: Stack contains " ++ show stack

While it does work ...

*Main>  solveRPNWrapper "10 4 3 + 2 *  -"
-4

... I can see this is anything but idiomatic (surely lots of duplication in the operator bit and the read/show seems redundant), and the constraints might be messed up too.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted
  1. Change the type of the stack to Integral a => [a]. This not only removes the need for read and show everywhere, but also reveals a hidden type error in your original code. You were using fractional division (/) instead of integer division (div).

  2. Reverse the stack. Lists are easier to manipulate from the front, so use that as the top of your stack. This also lets us use pattern matching on the stack to pick elements from the top of the stack easily instead of messing around with last and init. This is also more efficient.

  3. Use a lookup table for the operators. This cuts down further on the duplication, and we can just store the corresponding Haskell functions (+, div, etc.) directly in the table.

This is what I ended up with after making those changes:

solveRPNWrapper :: (Read a, Integral a) => String -> a
solveRPNWrapper str = solveRPN [] $ words str

solveRPN :: (Read a, Integral a) => [a] -> [String] -> a
solveRPN [result] [] = result
solveRPN (y : x : stack) (token : tokens)
  | Just f <- lookup token operators = solveRPN (f x y : stack) tokens
solveRPN stack (token : tokens) = solveRPN (read token : stack) tokens
solveRPN stack [] = error $ "Badly formatted expression: Stack contains " ++ show (reverse stack)

operators :: Integral a => [(String, a -> a -> a)]
operators = [("+", (+)), ("-", (-)), ("*", (*)), ("/", div)]

You could also use a fold instead of recursion, but that would require adding some more error handling to the wrapper. I'd also consider using just Integer instead of Integral a => a, but that's just a matter of changing the type signatures.

For robustness, it would also probably be a good idea to use a pure form of error handling like Either or Maybe instead of using error, and use reads instead of read to handle malformed input.

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Thanks ... just reversing the list and avoiding the read/show stuff seems to cut down most of the ugliness in my version! –  agam Apr 18 '12 at 4:49

You can use a Map or just key-value pairs to store your operations:

ops = [("+",(+)),("-",(-)),("/",(/)),("*",(*))]

calcFunction :: String -> String -> String -> String
calcFunction op x y = go $ lookup op ops where
  go (Just f) = show $ read x `f` read y
  go Nothing = error $ "Unknown operator: " ++ op ++ "."

isOperator :: String -> Bool
isOperator op = elem op $ fst $ unzip ops
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The others already told you almost everything in order to improve your code. I just wanted to add that there exists a very nicely written chapter in the book Learn You a Haskell, Functioanlly Solving Problems, whose first section explains exactly how to write a basic Reverse Nolish notation calculator by using foldl.

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Wow this foldl version is embarrassingly elegant. –  agam Apr 18 '12 at 4:51

Use lists efficiently (easy)

A simple method of making it more idiomatic is to reverse stack (this makes it a little more like a true stack), which allows you to use pattern matching and makes the code more efficient since attaching/reading at the head of list is an O(1) operation, while doing so at the end is O(n) i.e.:

solveRPN :: (Read a, Integral a) => [String] -> [String] -> a
solveRPN [] (x:[]) = read x
solveRPN [] (x:y:xs) = solveRPN (y:x:[]) xs -- push them on backwards
solveRPN stack@(s1:s2:rest) (x:xs) -- pattern match on stack with length >= 2
         | isOperator x =
           let z = calcFunction x s2 s1
           in solveRPN rest (z:xs)
         | otherwise = solveRPN (x:stack) xs
solveRPN stack (x:xs) -- last case: list with a single element
         | isOperator x = error "Stack too small"
         | otherwise = solveRPN (x:stack) xs

Use the typesystem (important!)

You are using strings to encapsulate the two possible types on the input stack: operations and numbers, which allows for invalid input, idiomatic Haskell will leverage the type system so that a function always has a defined result (i.e. so that all functions are total).

It better is to use an ADT (algebraic data type) to encapsulate the possible operations and Either to distinguish between operations and literals in a type-safe way:

data Operation = Plus | Minus | Times | Divide

-- conversion function
readStackVar :: (Read a) => String -> Either Operation a
readStackVar "+" = Left Plus
readStackVar "-" = Left Minux
readStackVar "*" = Left Times
readStackVar "/" = Left Divide
readStackVar other = Right . read $ other

This allows you to write isOperator nicely (although it's actually unnecessary now):

isOperator :: Either Operation a -> Bool
isOperator (Left _) = False
isOperator _ = True

calcFunction is now typesafe (note the type doesn't have the Either) and there is no possibility of an unrecognised operation:

calcFunction :: (Integral a) => Operation -> a -> a -> a
calcFunction Plus = (+)
calcFunction Minus = (-)
calcFunction Times = (*)
calcFunction Divide = div -- integral division

Using these we can rewrite solveRPN (notice that we've avoided having to pass an empty list to solveRPN by using the where clause):

solveRPN :: (Read a, Integral a) => [Either Operation a] -> a
solveRPN xs = go [] xs
   where
     go :: (Read a, Integral a) => [a] -> [Either Operation a] -> a
     go [] [] = error "Empty"
     go (x:xs) [] = x -- finished all the input
     go [] (x:y:xs) = go (y:x:[]) xs -- start the stack in reverse order

     go (s1:s2:rest) ((Left op):xs) = go ((calcFunction op s1 s2) : rest) xs -- operation   
     go stack ((Right x):xs) = go (x:stack) xs -- literal

Notice that I've been able to use pattern matching on the Left and Right of Either to distinguish between operations and literals. (An additional thing we could (and should) do is make solveRPN return Maybe a so that errors can be indicated by returning Nothing and success by returning Just x.)

This is used like:

solveRPN . map readStackVar . words $ "1 2 + 3 *"

(Warning: I haven't actually tested this, so there may be typos and small logic errors)

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If you define

data Token a = Literal a
             | Operator (a -> a -> a)

write a suitable

parseToken :: String -> Token a

and rewrite solveRPN to use this signature

solveRPN :: [a] -> [Token a] -> a

then isOperator and calcFunction become somewhat trivial, and you can avoid all that tedious reading and showing.

But, you'll have to stop fudging the division issue: / is only for Fractional (not Integral) types. You've been getting away with it so far because you're converting from and to strings every time, so the numbers have been converted to a fractional type when you've been doing division. You'll have to decide whether you want to use div or quot instead, or whether you want to use a fractional type.

(Also, the results of parseToken and solveRPN should be wrapped inside Maybe (or an Either type) so you can indicate failure with Nothing instead of throwing an exception.)

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