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This is an existing general css rule (original file):

.caption-top {
  color: red;
}

This is schematic, because in real life case, I need the .caption-top selector to become something else, depending on the context. But I would like to use a variable instead of changing the all occurrences of the selector. For example, in one context, it should become .field-name-field-caption-top. So I did this (wrapper file):

@caption-top:  .field-name-field-caption-top;
@caption-top {
  color: red;
}

This generates a LESS parse error. Is there another method to establish a rule to substitute a selector? So that, for the above example, the rule will finally look like this:

.field-name-field-caption-top {
  color: red;
}

Additional info

The whole point is to not touch the original css file, because it comes from outside and will be overwritten, but instead, to wrap it and tell Less how to replace existing classes with classes used in a particular theme. If it is not possible to achieve, then acceptable solution will be to change the original file in an automatic way, like e.g. replace all occurrences of ".caption" with "@caption" (which I suggested in the above code sample) or make an import at the beginning etc. Then use a wrapper Less file (aware of the theme implementation) to specify what classes whould be replaced with what.

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Is that not what mixins are for? –  cchana Apr 17 '12 at 11:31
    
I don't know. but when you go to online less tool and enter the code above, there is fatal parse error. –  camcam Apr 18 '12 at 12:12

3 Answers 3

You need to produce a function of two arguments that generates the desired CSS:

.generator(@fieldName, @fieldCaption) {
  .@{fieldName}-@{fieldCaption}-top {
    color: red;
  }
}
.generator(foo, bar);

(Feel free to try this in the online less compiler)

This piece of code produces the desired CSS for elements with name "foo" and caption "bar". You just need to make more calls to the .generator function with different arguments to obtain what you need.

If this does not correspond to what you need, please provide one additional example of your desired CSS output.

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You can use escaping to achieve this:

@selector: '.myclass';

(~'@{selector}') {
    color: red;
}

However you cannot do this:

(~'@{selector}') .another {
    color: red;
}

To achieve the above you will need to alter the variable

@selector: '.myclass .another';
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1  
How can you also use &? &(~'@{selector}') .another {} doesn't work. –  BullfrogBlues Oct 5 '12 at 16:34

It looks like mixins are what you need:

.caption-top {
    color: red;
}
.field-name-field-caption-top {
    .caption-top
}

You can define a class that, used or not, you can then reference again and again inside other selectors. You can even combine them with new styles, thereby extending what the original block of CSS would have done:

.field-name-field-caption-bottom {
    font-size: 3em;
    .caption-top
}

Give it a go in the compiler!

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