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Is this method signature valid?

public Boolean isBikeTyreFlat(){}

Note that I am trying to return an Object not a primitive here.

Thanks :)

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Why don't you try this in your code. –  RanRag Apr 17 '12 at 9:36
    
Very much valid. –  Kuldeep Jain Apr 17 '12 at 9:38
    
Sorry... I know this will work, but is it a valid against the javabean naming standards? –  JohnnyW Apr 17 '12 at 9:38
    
You should edit your question with that piece of information and look at this: stackoverflow.com/questions/3698171/…. –  assylias Apr 17 '12 at 9:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In JavaBeans, the getter method for boolean can be getXXX() or isXXX(). Since Boolean is not a primitive type, a getXXX() is required. The isXXX() is only for the boolean primitive type (thanks @Kemoda).

Refer to section 8.3.2 of the JavaBeans Specification.

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per the propertydescriptor spec isXXX only works for primitive boolean –  Kemoda Sep 2 '13 at 7:12
    
@Kemoda, Had to create a test case and you're right. I've updated my question accordingly. –  Buhake Sindi Sep 2 '13 at 9:31
    
yes, i know it because it bite me recently, i was forced to refactor all my boolean getters to the "get" form in some of the layers of my apps. –  Kemoda Sep 2 '13 at 11:14

In strict JavaBeans, this is a valid name (see the answer of @TheEliteGentleman).

However, please make sure you are not doing something like this:

public class BikeTyre {
    private boolean flat;
    public Boolean isBikeTyreFlat() {
        return flat;
    }
}

This is not recommended, since the name of your field does not match the method name. Some frameworks allow adding annotations to both the internal Field and the getter/setter of a Java Bean; the mismatch could confuse these frameworks. Please also note that it is bad practice to add the class name to your field; your method should just be isFlat().

Of course, this is perfectly valid:

public class Unicycle {
    private boolean bikeTyreFlat;
    public Boolean isBikeTyreFlat() {
        return bikeTyreFlat;
    }
}

But then again, are you really modelling unicycles? ;-)

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I have to disagree with this answer. I had this same question and wrote a quick test.

Given the JavaBean as:

package example;

public class FooBean {

    private Boolean published;

    public void setPublished(Boolean published) {
        this.published = published;
    }

    public Boolean isPublished() {
        return published;
    }

}

And a Main class that looks like:

package example;

import java.beans.BeanInfo;
import java.beans.IntrospectionException;
import java.beans.Introspector;
import java.beans.PropertyDescriptor;

public class Main {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {



        BeanInfo beanInfo = null;
        try {
            beanInfo = Introspector.getBeanInfo(FooBean.class);
        } catch (IntrospectionException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        PropertyDescriptor[] propertyDescriptors = beanInfo.getPropertyDescriptors();

        for(PropertyDescriptor descriptor : propertyDescriptors){
            System.out.println("descriptor: " + descriptor);
            System.out.println("descriptor.getName(): " + descriptor.getName());
            System.out.println("descriptor.getReadMethod(): " + descriptor.getReadMethod());
        }

    }

}

The result of running the main class is:

descriptor: java.beans.PropertyDescriptor@1e746992
descriptor.getName(): class
descriptor.getReadMethod(): public final native java.lang.Class java.lang.Object.getClass()
descriptor: java.beans.PropertyDescriptor@c994fbad
descriptor.getName(): published
descriptor.getReadMethod(): null

If I change FooBean.java to look like this:

package example;

public class FooBean {

    private boolean published;

    public void setPublished(boolean published) {
        this.published = published;
    }

    public boolean isPublished() {
        return published;
    }

}

Then the resulting output is:

descriptor: java.beans.PropertyDescriptor@18072768
descriptor.getName(): class
descriptor.getReadMethod(): public final native java.lang.Class java.lang.Object.getClass()
descriptor: java.beans.PropertyDescriptor@1e2ff4ad
descriptor.getName(): published
descriptor.getReadMethod(): public boolean example.FooBean.isPublished()

This tells me that for it to be a valid JavaBeans signature, the type must be declared a primitive boolean value.

Edit Upon further testing it appears that just the declared return type of the isXxx() method must be boolean for JavaBeans to recognize it:

package example;

public class FooBean {

    private Boolean published;

    public void setPublished(Boolean published) {
        this.published = published;
    }

    public boolean isPublished() {
        return published;
    }

}

Result:

descriptor: java.beans.PropertyDescriptor@1e746992
descriptor.getName(): class
descriptor.getReadMethod(): public final native java.lang.Class java.lang.Object.getClass()
descriptor: java.beans.PropertyDescriptor@f96377e5
descriptor.getName(): published
descriptor.getReadMethod(): public boolean example.FooBean.isPublished()
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Your Edit section contradicts the very first statement which states: I have to disagree with the accepted answer.. :-) –  Buhake Sindi Aug 25 '14 at 21:56
    
@BuhakeSindi I have updated it to refer to the actual answer I was referring to :) –  FGreg Aug 26 '14 at 13:19

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