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I'm trying to modulise legacy code and in doing so I've come across this problem:

I have two classes that belong in the same module - along with many other classes - and each class has one or more public methods used else-where. I want to create a general interface for the module but I'm not sure how to go about doing this. If I create one interface for the module I'll end up having to implement blank methods in all the classes that use the interface, which doesn't sound very good. However if I create multiple interfaces that can be used by specific classes within the module I'm left with combining them all inter one interface that is just used for type referencing:

/-------------\     /-------------\
| Interface A |     | Interface B |
\-------------/     \-------------/
/-------------\     /-------------\
|   Class A   |     |   Class B   |
\-------------/     \-------------/

/-------------\     /-------------\
| Interface A |     | Interface B |
\-------------/     \-------------/
            ^         ^
            |         |
        /------------------\
        | Module Interface |
        \------------------/

Are there any design patterns that will help me with this or is combining the interfaces that make up a specific module into a sub-interface to represent the module type the correct way to achieve this?

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What the hell is a module? Are you talking about package, maven subproject...? –  Adam Gent Apr 17 '12 at 11:30
    
I mean the programming concept of modules, it's not a Java specific thing. The general idea is to create modules and to interface them, that way when we want to change a how a module works i.e. maybe to make it more efficent, we replace the code under the interface and everything outside of that carries on working unaware of the change. –  Alexei Blue Apr 17 '12 at 11:33
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure I really understand your problem but you can combine interfaces into one interface through inheritance. That is interfaces support multiple inheritance.

A pattern that might be applicable to you is the adapter pattern: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adapter_pattern

Also try not to make interfaces for the sake of making them. Java has this long standing history of trying to make interfaces for stuff that will never have another implementation. Unless your making an API consider KISS.

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If you create a common interface, the users of that interface will expect all its methods to work (unless explicitly stated in the documentation how to use).

If you end up having to specify convoluted rules on the interface level on how to use it so both modules work well, you have a case where creating a custom interface is not the best idea.

However, if there are only a few methods in both modules that are different from the other and the differences do not break the module if called, you can create a custom interface, then provide a default abstract implmentation of each module's interface, from which the actual modules derive. The abstract implementation can define a default (e.g. do-nothing) implementation for all methods in the common interface so the concrete module classes do nothave to implement them specifically

interface AIface {
  void methodA();
}

interface BIface {
  void methodB();
}

interface CommonIface extends AIface, BIface {
}

abstract class CommonAbstract implements CommonIface {
  @Override
  void methodA() {}
  @Override
  void methodB() {}
}

class ModuleA extends CommonAbstract {
  @Override
  void methodA() {
    // A's implementation
  }
}

class ModuleB extends CommonAbstract {
  @Override
  void methodB() {
    // B's implementation
  }
}
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