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I'm stuck with a Java OOP problem. I have come up with some toy code to explain the problem. Here are my classes -

Class 1 - Car.java

public class Car {

    public void reportProblem(String problem){
        ReportUtil.reportVehicleInfo("Car", 4, problem); //4 is number of wheels
    }

    //bunch of other methods
}

Class 2 - Truck.java

public class Truck {
    public void reportProblem(String problem){
        ReportUtil.reportVehicleInfo("Truck", 6, problem);
    }

    //bunch of other methods
}

Class 3 - ReportUtil.java

public class ReportUtil {
    public static void reportVehicleInfo(String name, int wheels, String problem){
        System.out.println(String.format("%s %s %s", name, wheels, problem));
    }
}

Class 4 - Test.java

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Car c = new Car();
        c.reportProblem("puncture");

        Truck t = new Truck();
        t.reportProblem("engine missing");
    }
}

I want to abstract the "reportProblem" method implementation in "Car" and "Truck" to a parent class. This is what I did -

Class 1 - Vehicle.java

public abstract class Vehicle {
    public String mName;
    public int mNumWheels;

    public void reportProblem(String problem){
        ReportUtil.reportVehicleInfo(mName, mNumWheels, problem);
    }

    public void setName(String name){
        mName = name;
    }

    public void setNumWheels(int numWheels){
        mNumWheels=numWheels;
    }
}

Class 2 - Car.java

public class Car extends Vehicle {

    //bunch of other methods
}

Class 3 - Truck.java

public class Truck extends Vehicle {

    //bunch of other methods
}

Class 4 - ReportUtil.java (No change made to this class).

public class ReportUtil {   
    public static void reportVehicleInfo(String name, int wheels, String problem){
        System.out.println(String.format("%s %s %s", name, wheels, problem));
    }
}

Class 5 - Test.java

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Car c = new Car();
        c.setName("Car"); //NOTE : Can be missed!
        c.setNumWheels(4); //NOTE : Can be missed!
        c.reportProblem("puncture");

        Truck t = new Truck();
        t.setName("Truck"); //NOTE : Can be missed!
        t.setNumWheels(6); //NOTE : Can be missed!
        t.reportProblem("engine missing");
    }
}

This achieves what I want (I have abstracted the implementation of "reportProblem"). But I know this is not the best way to do it. One reason is that the "reportProblem" method should not be called without calling "setName" and "setNumWheels" methods. Otherwise 'null' will be passed. Is there a way of enforcing, using some OOP technique, the two methods calls (setName and setNumWheels) BEFORE reportProblem is called?

I hope I have made myself clear. If I am not, just let me know how you would have done it so that I can learn from it.

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, make name and numWheels final and assign then in the constructor. So...

Class 1 - Vehicle.java

public abstract class Vehicle {
  public final String mName;
  public final int mNumWheels;

  protected Vehicle(String name, int numWheels){
    this.mName = name;
    this.mNumWheels = numWheels;
  }

  public void reportProblem(String problem){
    ReportUtil.reportVehicleInfo(mName, mNumWheels, problem);
  }
  ...
}

Class 2 - Car.java

public class Car extends Vehicle {

   public Car(){
     super("Car", 4);
   }
 //bunch of other methods
}

Class 3 - Truck.java

public class Truck extends Vehicle {

   public Truck(){
     super("Truck", 6);
   }
//bunch of other methods
}

Also, public fields are not good OO practice, because they expose details of your class' implementation that could be modified by users of the class. Those fields should be private. If the clients of the class need to know about them (or change them), then you should allow public getter (or setter) methods.

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Thanks! This is much better than doing super.mName = "Car" from Car's contructor! This is what I wanted. I think the mName and mNumWheels should be private in Vehicle. –  MediumOne Apr 17 '12 at 12:17
    
Correct. I just copied what you had. Notice the last statement in my post. –  John B Apr 17 '12 at 12:21
    
Oh yes! I just noticed. Thanks! –  MediumOne Apr 17 '12 at 12:24
    
In Car, if I create a member variable - private final String mCar = "Car"; and then pass it in the constructor as super(mCar, 4);, why do I get the following error - Cannot refer to an instance field mCar while explicitly invoking a constructor –  MediumOne Apr 17 '12 at 12:49
    
Because it is not possible to pass an instance field (or an instance method call) to super(). You can only pass constructor parameters, static fields/method calls. Try with private static final String mCar = "Car"; –  Tony Apr 17 '12 at 14:02
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If you want to set the fields "required", you can set them as parameters in Truck/Car constructors and not provide a default constructor for these classes.

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What is the point of a private default constructor? Why not just not include it? Generally a private constructor should only be used in a class that has a static factory method or in a utility class with only static methods and therefore no need for an instance to ever be created. –  John B Apr 17 '12 at 12:13
    
Thanks! I got it! I assigned the name and numWheels in the Truck/Car contructors! Now, I don't have to set them again in Test.java. In fact, we don't even need the set methods (setName and setNumWheels) in Vehicle! But I don't understand why I need to set them as private. –  MediumOne Apr 17 '12 at 12:14
    
@MediumOne it is considered poor OO practice to expose the implementation of a class. This includes access to fields. The case for this is generally two statements. First, if you decide you want to change field names for your implementation (change an int to an Integer, etc) you don't want to affect users. If access is limited to a getter method your impact is more limited. Second, you want to be able to control the manipulation of fields via a setter to allow for validation (ensure something isn't set to null). That said, public final is safe but not good practice. –  John B Apr 17 '12 at 12:20
    
@John: The aim of the private constructor is to prevent the creation of the Car/Truck objects without the fields setted. Now combined with the public constructor with arguments, you can have evolutive objects (let's say you want to instanciate a truck with 4 wheels) instead of "static" objects you have with your method. –  Tony Apr 17 '12 at 12:21
2  
You are missing the point. If there is a constructor with arguments Java does not provide a default constructor so there is no need to hide it. Again, what is the point of a private constructor of an abstract class? It can NEVER be called. –  John B Apr 17 '12 at 12:24
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If members are essentials for an object's state/functionality, put them as part of a constructor, so it is not possible to create an object (and call the method of concern) without providing proper values for these members.
But you should not also provide a no-args constructor.
If there are too many parameters needed consider looking into the Builder idion

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I do have lots of parameters. So, is there no way other than using a Builder pattern? –  MediumOne Apr 17 '12 at 12:37
1  
If you need to have object properly constructed check-out rwhansen.blogspot.com/2007/07/… –  Cratylus Apr 17 '12 at 13:34
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In addition to @Tony's answer (+1) if you have to use bean notation (default constructor and setters) and still do not want to allow using any business methods before the object is initialized you can do the following.

Define abstract method checkInitalized() in your Vehicle class. Implement this methods for your Car and Truck. BTW this method will probably have default implementation in Vehicle. In this case do not forget to call super from its overridden versions.

checkInitalized() should throw exception (e.g. IllegalStateException) if not all required fields are initialized. Now call this method in the beginning of each business method. This will prevent you from using object that is not initialized yet.

This technique is a little bit verbose. Probably using wrapper pattern or AOP (e.g. AspectJ) may be useful here.

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