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I'm trying to configure mysql on an Amazon EC2 micro instance with 613MB memory. This instance will only be used for running the mysql, so i want to use as much memory as possible. We have another instance of the same DB running on a different host, so i can easily compare results.

Performing a mediocre query on the original db took less than 3 seconds. Before my changes on the EC2, it took 46 seconds, but now, after changing the settings, the same query only took 4 seconds. However, executing the same query once more, it seems to take forever.

This are the settings i use in my MySql my.cnf:

[mysqld]
datadir=/var/lib/mysql
socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
user=mysql
# Disabling symbolic-links is recommended to prevent assorted security risks
symbolic-links=0

innodb_buffer_pool_size = 128M
query_cache_size = 128M
query_cache_limit = 8M
key_buffer_size = 128M

table_open_cache = 2048
table_definition_cache = 2048
read_buffer_size = 64M
join_buffer_size = 64M
sort_buffer_size = 64M
myisam_sort_buffer_size = 64M

[mysqld_safe]
log-error=/var/log/mysqld.log
pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid

I don't think the myisam param should be included tho, since it should all be using innodb, but i just gave it some extra memory just in case it is needed.

It would be logical if it was slower at first run, and after that go faster, but this just seems illogical.

Any idea's would be very welcome.

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2 Answers 2

EC2 micro has a generally terrible performance. You could get Linode/Rackspace for the same price.

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I know that EC2 micro isn't that great, but i gotta work with what my boss provides ;-) Anyway, that shouldn't be a reason why a query goes fast the first time and take alot longer when you run it the 2nd time with nothing else changed in the database. If at all, query cache should make it faster. –  Andy Apr 19 '12 at 13:54
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Amazon Micro instances "may opportunistically increase CPU capacity in short bursts when additional cycles are available."

This means you're allocated X units of computation but it can jump to X + N when other Micro instances are not using their allocation and your instance will automatically scavenge it.

This is likely why you are seeing fluctuations in performance.

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