Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an inheritance chain of CRTP classes. The CRTP classes derive from each other, until a 'final' derived class passes itself as the CRTP parameter and finalizes the inheritance chain.

template <class W>
struct Base
{
    .....
};
template <class W>
struct Derived_inheritable: public Base<W>
{
....
}

template <class W>
struct Derived2_inheritable: public Derived_inheritable<W>
{
....
}

...

What I want to do is to be able to have such 'final' end-user classes at each level of the CRTP inheritance chain, that involve no templates:

typedef Derived1_inheritable<Derived1> Derived1;

As you can guess, this typedef does not work, because it references its own type being defined. The question is how to achieve this? The way I could think of, is:

struct Derived1: public Derived1_inheritable<Derived1>
{
   //not convenient, need to redefine at least a forwarding constructor
}

As the comment in the code says, this is not a very elegant solution - I need to redefine the constructor to forward to the base constructor. Does anyone know a more elegant way?

share|improve this question
2  
I can't say your examples were illuminating, and the phrasing of the question, an intermediate class that is final, is self-contradictory. What are you trying to achieve, exactly? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Apr 17 '12 at 13:09
    
Intermediate here means that I have CRTP classes that derive from each other, until a final derived class passes itself as the CRTP parameter and finalizes the inheritance chain. What I want to do is th be able to have such 'final' classes at each level of the CRTP inheritance chain –  Alexander Vassilev Apr 17 '12 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

I think I found an elegant solution:

template <class W>
struct Base
{
   .....
};
template <class W>
struct Derived_inheritable: public Base<W>
{
....
}

//solution
struct Derived2_dummy;

template <class W=derived2d_ummy>
struct Derived2_inheritable: public Derived_inheritable<W>
{
....
}
struct derived2_dummy: public: Derived_inheritable<>{};
typedef Derived2_inheritable<> Derived2;
share|improve this answer

typedef Derived1_inheritable Derived1;

That line makes no sense, the argument to the template is a type but you are trying to pass a template (incidentally the same template that you are instantiating, but besides that extra quirk the fact is that your template takes a type as argument and you are passing a non-type)

It is not really clear from the question what you are trying to achieve. You should work on stating your goal rather than your approach to solving that goal.

I want to make a "final" class for each DerivedX_inheritable that is non-template and passes itself as the W parameter.

That is exactly done in the code that you produded:

struct Derived1: public Derived1_inheritable<Derived1> {}

which is a type definition (make a "final" class). The fact that your CRTP bases require arguments that must be provided by the end user and the need of the forwarding constructor thereof is just a side effect of your design.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, it's a typo. I updated the code –  Alexander Vassilev Apr 17 '12 at 13:15
    
Well, I thought the best way to illustrate it is to write the code that shows the class hierarchy. I guess the typedef line is what is confusing here, so I have clarified it in the comment to the first answer. –  Alexander Vassilev Apr 17 '12 at 13:21
    
Yes, it's a side effect, and I am looking for a way to compensate for it, by defining end-user classes at each level, that involve no templates. I am looking for an alternative solution to the one I have found, because I don't want to create (hence the typedef, if it were possible) additional classes (and constructors) –  Alexander Vassilev Apr 17 '12 at 13:27
    
@AlexanderVassilev: Whether you like it or not, that is what your design leads to. There's nothing you can do there. You could try writing a macro that will take some of the boiler plate, but you need to define a new type, and that type must have a constructor –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 17 '12 at 14:44
    
I came to the same conclusion. There is no other way I can achieve the benefits of this design, so this inconvenience is quite small compared to the benefits. Thanks for the help. –  Alexander Vassilev Apr 17 '12 at 15:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.