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I have a List of objects in C#. All of the objects contain the properties dept and course.
There are several objects that have the same dept and course.

How can I trim the List(or make a new List) where there is only one object per unique (dept & course) properties.

[Any additional duplicates are dropped out of the List]

I know how to do this with a single property:

fooList.GroupBy(x => x.dept).Select(x => x.First());

However, I am wondering how to do this for multiple properties (2 or more)?

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Does your list need to be sortable? –  Dave S Apr 17 '12 at 13:39
    
I have already sorted the list by the time I reach this point. –  Baxter Apr 17 '12 at 13:41
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To use multiple properties you can use an anonymous type:

var query = fooList.GroupBy(x => new { x.Dept, x.Course })
                   .Select(x => x.First());

Of course, this depends on what types Dept and Course are to determine equality. Alternately, your classes can implement IEqualityComparer<T> and then you could use the Enumerable.Distinct method that accepts a comparer.

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Both Dept and Course are ints. –  Baxter Apr 17 '12 at 13:44
    
@Baxter then this approach would work just fine. –  Ahmad Mageed Apr 17 '12 at 13:53
    
That seemed to do the trick! However, I am wondering since I am using an anonymous type how can I pass around "var query"? What sort of method signature would accept that? Or is there some kind of conversion I do to return back to its original type, etc.,? –  Baxter Apr 17 '12 at 19:06
    
@Baxter the query above returns an IEnumerable<T>, where T is your original class used in fooList. The anonymous type was used only for the grouping; the final projection made by the select statement is the original class. For this query you would pass it around to anything that accepted an IEnumerable<T>. If you need a list, add .ToList() to the end of the query. –  Ahmad Mageed Apr 17 '12 at 19:09
    
So I could do something as simple as: List<OriginalType> myGroupedList = query.ToList(); –  Baxter Apr 17 '12 at 19:13
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Another approach is to use the LINQ Distinct extension method together with an IEqualityComparer<Foo>. It requires you to implement a comparer; however, the latter is reusable and testable.

public class FooDeptCourseEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<Foo>
{
    public bool Equals(Foo x, Foo y)
    {
        return
            x.Dept == y.Dept &&
            x.Course.ToLower() == y.Course.ToLower();
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Foo obj)
    {
        unchecked {
            return 527 + obj.Dept.GetHashCode() * 31 + obj.Course.GetHashCode();
        }
    }

    #region Singleton Pattern

    public static readonly FooDeptCourseEqualityComparer Instance =
        new FooDeptCourseEqualityComparer();

    private FooDeptCourseEqualityComparer() { }

    #endregion
}

My example uses the singleton pattern. Since the class does not have any state information, we do not need to create a new instance each time we use it.

My code does not handle null values. Of course you would have to handle them, if they can occur.

The unique values are returned like this

var result = fooList.Distinct(FooDeptCourseEqualityComparer.Instance);

UPDATE

I suggest using a generic EqualityComparer class that accepts lambda expressions in the constructor and can be reused in multiple situations

public class LambdaEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    private Func<T, T, bool> _areEqual;
    private Func<T, int> _getHashCode;

    public LambdaEqualityComparer(Func<T, T, bool> areEqual,
                                  Func<T, int> getHashCode)
    {
        _areEqual = areEqual;
        _getHashCode = getHashCode;
    }

    public LambdaEqualityComparer(Func<T, T, bool> areEqual)
        : this(areEqual, obj => obj.GetHashCode())
    {
    }

    #region IEqualityComparer<T> Members

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return _areEqual(x, y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return _getHashCode(obj);
    }

    #endregion
}

You can use it like this

var comparer = new LambdaEqualityComparer<Foo>(
    (x, y) => x.Dept == y.Dept && x.Course == y.Course,
    obj => {
        unchecked {
            return 527 + obj.Dept.GetHashCode() * 31 + obj.Course.GetHashCode();
        }
    }
);

var result = fooList.Distinct(comparer);

Note: You have to provide a calculation of the hash code, since Distinct uses an internal Set<T> class, which in turn uses hash codes.


UPDATE #2

An even more generic equality comparer implements the comparison automatically and accepts a list of property accessors; however, you have no control, on how the comparison is performed.

public class AutoEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    private Func<T, object>[] _propertyAccessors;

    public AutoEqualityComparer(params Func<T, object>[] propertyAccessors)
    {
        _propertyAccessors = propertyAccessors;
    }

    #region IEqualityComparer<T> Members

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        foreach (var getProp in _propertyAccessors) {
            if (!getProp(x).Equals(getProp(y))) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        unchecked {
            int hash = 17;
            foreach (var getProp in _propertyAccessors) {
                hash = hash * 31 + getProp(obj).GetHashCode();
            }
            return hash;
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

Usage

var comparer = new AutoEqualityComparer<Foo>(foo => foo.Dept,
                                             foo => foo.Course);
var result = fooList.Distinct(comparer);
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