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I have two tables that I'm currently joining on three fields:

SELECT t1.A, t1.B, t1.C, t2.D
  FROM t1, t2
 WHERE t1.A = t2.A
   AND t1.B = t2.B
   AND t1.C = t2.C

Because of the way my data works, if the join does not match up on A/B/C, then I want to join on A/B. If that join does not match up, then I just want to join on A. Is this type of cascading join possible within a SQL query (I'm using Oracle 10g)? Or do I have to handle this with code?

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1  
Not sure, but sounds like you're wanting a LEFT INNER join. –  Marc B Apr 17 '12 at 14:24
    
If ultimately you will accept rows that only join on A then all the other rows effectively become moot don't they? Wouldn't it be the same as just joining on A from the start? –  Ollie Apr 17 '12 at 15:19
1  
I'm going for increasing levels of detail based on the availability of data. But you may be right, I should take a second look. –  Paul Apr 17 '12 at 15:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Would this work for you?

  SELECT DISTINCT 
         t1.A,
         t1.B,
         t1.C,
         t2.D
    FROM t1, t2
   WHERE (t1.A = t2.A
          AND t1.B = t2.B
          AND t1.C = t2.C)
      OR (t1.A = t2.A
          AND t1.B = t2.B)
      OR (t1.A = t2.A);

EDIT:

If you wanted all the results but wanted to see how they were matched then you could issue this:

   SELECT t1.A,
          t1.B,
          t1.C,
          t2.D,
          (CASE 
              WHEN t1.A = t2.A
               AND t1.B = t2.B
               AND t1.C = t2.C
              THEN 'A/B/C'
              WHEN t1.A = t2.A
               AND t1.B = t2.B
              THEN 'A/B'
              WHEN t1.A = t2.A
              THEN 'A'
              ELSE 'None'
           END) AS match_criteria
     FROM t1, t2
    WHERE t1.A = t2.A; 

In the resultset you could see what level of matching the rows had and then use the data from there. Perhaps by wrapping this query in an outer query you could either discard the rows you didn't want or prioritise the ones you do want.

Hope it helps...

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1  
I think this works. Let me validate some data. –  Paul Apr 17 '12 at 15:07
1  
I did some testing and it looks like this is returning what I want. –  Paul Apr 17 '12 at 15:18
1  
This is just the same as the simpler: WHERE t1.A = t2.A –  ypercube Apr 17 '12 at 15:19
1  
If t1 contains the row (10, 11, 12) and t2 contains (10, 11, 12, X) and (10, 9, 8, Y) then your query will result in two rows while the question (or rather, my interpretation of the question) specifies only one row in the result set. Am I off base here? –  Larry Lustig Apr 17 '12 at 15:24
1  
@LarryLustig: I've tried to answer it a slightly different way in an edit to my answer. Hopefully it'll allow the OP to see how the rows were matched and then they can filter their results using that information. It might help them to decipher exactly what they need to from the data returned. I think the original question was perhaps a little vague in its initial requirement :-) –  Ollie Apr 17 '12 at 16:07
SELECT t1.A, t1.B, t1.C, t2.D
  FROM t1
  LEFT JOIN t2
  ON t1.A = t2.A AND t1.B = t2.B AND t1.C = t2.C

Try this and check if you like the results, if not, use this (psedo.code):

insert into #temptable
SELECT t1.A, t1.B, t1.C, t2.D
  FROM t1, t2
  WHERE t1.A = t2.A AND t1.B = t2.B AND t1.C = t2.C

IF select count(*) from #temptable = 0 then
insert into #temptable
SELECT t1.A, t1.B, t1.C, t2.D
  FROM t1, t2
  WHERE t1.A = t2.A AND t1.B = t2.B
end if;


IF select count(*) from #temptable = 0 then
insert into #temptable
SELECT t1.A, t1.B, t1.C, t2.D
  FROM t1, t2
  WHERE t1.A = t2.A
end if;

select * from #temptable
drop #temptable
share|improve this answer
    
The LEFT JOIN does not produce the result I'm looking for. I don't think the psuedo code will either, because it assumes that none of the records matched on A/B/C before trying to match on A/B or just A. There could be a scenario where some records match on all three, but some only match on two and some only match on one. –  Paul Apr 17 '12 at 14:51
    
Now I understand what you want :) –  aF. Apr 17 '12 at 16:29

You can do this by UNIONing the three queries together and, in the two more general queries, excluding the rows that were returned in a more specific query.

How you determine which rows to exclude from the more general queries depends on the shape of your data, but you might try something like this:

SELECT t1.A, t1.B, t1.C, t2.D
  FROM t1, t2
 WHERE t1.A = t2.A AND t1.B = t2.B AND t1.C = t2.C
UNION 
SELECT t1.A, t1.B, t1.C, t2.D
  FROM t1, t2
 WHERE t1.A = t2.A AND t1.B = t2.B 
  AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM t2 WHERE t2.A = t1.A AND t2.B = t1.B AND t2.C = t1.C)
UNION
SELECT t1.A, t1.B, t1.C, t2.D
  FROM t1, t2
 WHERE t1.A = t2.A
  AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM t2 WHERE t2.A = t1.A AND t2.B = t1.B)
share|improve this answer
    
This gives me the correct result, but is more expensive than Ollie's answer (at least for my data). –  Paul Apr 17 '12 at 15:19
    
Obviously, you know better what you want than I do. But a literal reading of your question indicates that Ollie's answer will return rows that you do not want in your result set. For a simple test case, see my comment under Ollie's answer. –  Larry Lustig Apr 17 '12 at 15:25
    
I get the same number of rows with both queries. But the run time is 49 seconds vs. 0.8 seconds. –  Paul Apr 17 '12 at 15:41
    
Unquestionably, Ollie's query will run faster. But I don't believe they'll return the same number of rows if you construct a sample data set that includes one of the cases you're specifically interested in -- a less specific match that should be filtered out because a more specific match exists. If they do return the same result then my query is also incorrect. –  Larry Lustig Apr 17 '12 at 16:04
1  
I have doubts about the faster, too, especially if you turn those UNION into UNION ALL. And before optimizing speed, you need to have a correct query. –  ypercube Apr 17 '12 at 16:13

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