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I have the following csv file:

hindex
1
2
2
6
3
3
3
2
2

I am trying to read the row and check its value but it gives the following error:

ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'hindex'

The code is:

cr = csv.reader(open('C:\\Users\\chatterjees\\Desktop\\data\\topic_hindex.csv', "rb"))
for row in cr:
    x=row[0]
    if(int(x)<=10):
        print x

what's wrong in my code?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to skip row 1. It is trying to parse your column header from the file in to an int, but since it is a char string, it is choking and dying.

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what would you suggest to skip the row? I wud do the old fashion variable 'i' and increment it –  codious Apr 17 '12 at 14:31
    
@codious, I've presented some exapmle code to skip the row. –  cmh Apr 17 '12 at 14:31
1  
@codious Just as a note, if you used counting (which isn't the best way, as other answers have pointed out) then rather than making a variable and incrementing it, the better option would be enumerate() - e.g: for number, row in enumerate(cr):. –  Lattyware Apr 17 '12 at 14:34
    
@Lattyware +1 for the enumerate. amazing to learn python tricks. –  codious Apr 17 '12 at 14:37
2  
@codious Your optimal solution depends on the parameters of your particular situation. If you can be certain that line 1, only line 1, and always line 1 will have column header labels, the most efficient solution would probably be slicing like in cmh's answer. If you might have to skip text blocks on other lines that you can't predict, or line 1 only has text labels sometimes, the try/except block solution might suit you better. –  Silas Ray Apr 17 '12 at 14:46

The code tries to process every line in your file, including hindex. You are trying to convert this string to an int which throws the ValueError:

To skip the first line (which contains the headers) try:

cr = csv.reader(open('C:\\Users\\chatterjees\\Desktop\\data\\topic_hindex.csv', "rb"))
for row in cr[1:]:
    x=row[0]
    if(int(x)<=10):
        print x
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thanks for this. learning python so amazing to learn these simple tricks. –  codious Apr 17 '12 at 14:32
4  
cr[1:] reads the entire file to lop off one row. If it's a large file it will eat up lots of memory. Better would be to call next(cr) and then on the next line do for row in cr:. –  Steven Rumbalski Apr 17 '12 at 14:53
    
Ah, good point. –  cmh Apr 17 '12 at 14:57

Your first line in the .csv contains something which cannot be converted to an int, so

    if(int(x)<=10):

fails with a ValueError. (there is absolutely no need to enclose the expression in (), btw.)

You can eighter skip the first line of the .csv, or wrap int(x) into a try/catch block, like so:

for row in cr:
    x=row[0]
    try:
        x=int(x)
    except ValueError: # x cannot be converted to int
        continue       # so we skip this row
    if x<=10:  # no need for parens here
        print x

Learn more about Exceptions and handling those here: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/errors.html

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thanks for a slightly different approach. –  codious Apr 17 '12 at 14:38
    
While this works well with the example file given, this approach can easily cause grief in case you try to process other files. Consider a situation where accidentally a CSV file gets passed to you program that contains non numeric values in other rows. The program will cheerfully ignore them and move on with the next row instead of failing with a ValueError, consequently rejecting the file and pointing out to the user that a proper file should be passed. –  roskakori Oct 6 '12 at 6:54

Rather surprising nobody mentioned csv.DictReader, since it's really the simplest way to skip the header row and get the data in a nice dictionary format:

import csv
with open('C:\\Users\\chatterjees\\Desktop\\data\\topic_hindex.csv', "rb") as f:
    cr = csv.DictReader(f)
    for row in cr:
        x = row['hindex']
        if int(x) <= 10:
            print x
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The first row cannot be transform into an integer. You can skip all the rows like the first one by using a try except block:

cr = csv.reader(open('C:\\Users\\chatterjees\\Desktop\\data\\topic_hindex.csv', "rb"))
for row in cr:
  x=row[0]
  try:
    if int(x) <= 10:
      print x
  except ValueError:
    pass
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thanks a lot. +1 for the try catch suggestion. –  codious Apr 17 '12 at 14:33
    
almost gave +1, but please use except ValueError: –  Aprillion Jun 20 '12 at 19:23
    
I did it! Thank you for the correction! –  Thanasis Petsas Jun 22 '12 at 12:19

Here's a solution that skips the first and first row only and fails with ValueError in case any other row contains a non numeric value. It does so by using the built-in enumerate() function which keeps count of the number of rows processed. Furthermore it properly closes the input file when it's done using the with statement.

import csv
with open('C:\\Users\\chatterjees\\Desktop\\data\\topic_hindex.csv', 'rb') as csvFile:
    for rowNumber, row in enumerate(csv.reader(csvFile)):
        if rowNumber > 0:
            x = row[0]
            if int(x) <= 10:
                print x
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Just one more alternative here. I wrote a wrapper library which could handle this task at ease too. Suppose you have saved the data in a file named "topic_hindex.csv" in the directory where the following script is.

import pyexcel


r = pyexcel.SeriesReader("topic_hindex.csv")
for row in r.rows():
    x = row[0]
    if x <= 10:
        print x

Or alternatively, you can use a filter:

import pyexcel


r = pyexcel.SeriesReader("topic_hindex.csv")
eval_func = lambda row: row[0] <= 10
r.filter(pyexcel.RowValueFilter(eval_func))
for row in r.rows():
    print row[0]
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