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I have a table of the form:

A1, B1, C1, (value)
A1, B1, C1, (value)
A1, B1, C2, (value)
A1, B2, C1, (value)
A1, B2, C1, (value)
A1, B2, C2, (value)
A1, B2, C2, (value)
A2, B1, C1, (value)
A2, B1, C1, (value)
A2, B1, C2, (value)
A2, B1, C2, (value)
A2, B2, C1, (value)
A2, B2, C1, (value)
A2, B2, C2, (value)
A2, B2, C2, (value)

I'd like to work with it in python as a dictionary, of form:

H = {
    'A1':{
        'B1':{
            'C1':[],'C2':[],'C3':[] },
        'B2':{
            'C1':[],'C2':[],'C3':[] },
        'B3':{
            'C1':[],'C2':[],'C3':[] }
    },
    'A2':{
        'B1':{
            'C1':[],'C2':[],'C3':[] },
        'B2':{
            'C1':[],'C2':[],'C3':[] },
        'B3':{
            'C1':[],'C2':[],'C3':[] }
    }
}

So that H[A][B][C] yields a particular unique list of values. For small dictionaries, I might just define the structure in advance as above, but I am looking for an efficient way to iterate over the table and build a dictionary, without specifying the dictionary keys ahead of time. Thank you all!

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5  
Do you always look up a triple of A, B, C values? If so, you'd be better off with a single dict using those triples as keys. –  larsmans Apr 17 '12 at 14:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
input = [('A1', 'B1', 'C1', 'Value'), (...)]

from collections import defaultdict

tree = defaultdict(lambda: defaultdict(lambda: defaultdict(list)))
#Alternatively you could use partial() rather than lambda:
#tree = defaultdict(partial(defaultdict, partial(defaultdict, list)))

for x, y, z, value in input:
    tree[x][y][z].append(value)
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1  
Note that if table is a text file, you'll want something like with open("table") as file: input = [line.split() for line in file]. –  Lattyware Apr 17 '12 at 14:40
2  
An alternative to using lambdas here is to use functools.partial(): tree = defaultdict(partial(defaultdict, partial(defaultdict, list))) - I find this clearer, but that might just be me. –  Lattyware Apr 17 '12 at 14:43
    
@Lattyware Interesting, thanks for that. –  Steve Mayne Apr 17 '12 at 14:45
    
Perfect, this works exactly as I need. Thanks! –  Chris Cox Apr 17 '12 at 14:59

If you ever only access H[A][B][C] (that is, never H[A] oder H[A][B] alone), I'd suggest a IMO cleaner solution: Use Tuples as defaultdict Index:

from collections import defaultdict
h = defaultdict(list)
for a, b, c, value in input:
    h[a, b, c].append(value)
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This is a very valid (and elegant) solution too, although it does require that he doesn't want to access the sub-dicts separately. (edited to remove some extra indentation, unneeded brackets, and PEP-8ifying the variable names). –  Lattyware Apr 17 '12 at 14:49
    
Thanks for posting this solution. In this case, I need to access sub-dictionaries, but I didn't specify that in the question. This will be extremely elegant if this case exists in the future. –  Chris Cox Apr 17 '12 at 14:58
d = {}
for (a, b, c, value) in your_table_of_tuples:
   d.setdefault(a, {}).setdefault(b,{}).setdefault(c,[]).append(value)
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Why use setdefault() over a defaultdict? –  Lattyware Apr 17 '12 at 14:38
    
@Lattyware: why not? –  vartec Apr 17 '12 at 14:41
    
I would argue it's a lot uglier when you use it. –  Lattyware Apr 17 '12 at 14:46
    
@Lattyware: I would argue that lambdas are ugly. de gustibus... –  vartec Apr 17 '12 at 14:52
    
Which is why I offered up my functools.partial() based solution in the comments. ;) (Which could be expanded out for readability). –  Lattyware Apr 17 '12 at 14:53

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