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I have written the following function.

function obj()
{
     this.a;
}
obj.prototype.catch = function()
{
    alert('Catched')
}
obj.prototype.do = function()
{
    alert('called');
}

What i need is, to call obj::catch() after obj::do() is called and the call must be performed from inside obj::do() So how to pass the local function of obj to setTimeout

i have tried

obj.prototype.do = function()
 { 
     window.setTimeout('"'+this.catch+'()"',1000);
     alert('called');
 }

It does not worked Then i tried

 obj.prototype.do = function()
 { 
     window.setTimeout('"'+this+'.catch()"',1000);
     alert('called');
 }

which gave me the following error on Chrome console

Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected token ILLEGAL

So i tried the following dirty method(is it really dirty ?)

 obj.prototype.do = function()
 { 
     this.pid = randomVal(100);
     window['temp'+this.pid] = this;
     window.setTimeout("temp"+this.pid+".catch();",1000);
     alert('called');
 }
 function randomVal(bound)//returns a random number between 0 and <bound>
 {
       return (Math.floor(Math.random()*(bound)));
 }

That worked.

so why the first two methods not worked.Is there any other way to do the same thing without global variables.. The second method and last method are almost similar .But why am i gettng the error in second method..? The worked code can be found here http://jsfiddle.net/jXhAs/

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Don't pass strings to setTimeout … ever.

var self = this; // Because the scope will change
setTimeout(function () { self.catch() },1000);

Or if you are using JS 1.8.5:

setTimeout(this.catch.bind(this),1000);

You can read more about bind

share|improve this answer
    
why not to pass strings?Is there any performance degradation and why? –  Jinu Joseph Daniel Apr 17 '12 at 14:54
    
i think you may be overwriting window.self with that variable declaration. –  jbabey Apr 17 '12 at 14:54
    
@JinuJD — They are hard to debug, slow, break scope and can cause security problems if user data gets into them. –  Quentin Apr 17 '12 at 14:56
    
@jbabey — I'm masking it in the local scope. That isn't a problem as nothing else is using it. A different variable name can be used. self and that are common conventions. –  Quentin Apr 17 '12 at 14:56
    
ok...and thanks for the link on bind.It's new info for me –  Jinu Joseph Daniel Apr 17 '12 at 14:56

You should pass a function to setTimeout (not a string):

Example:

var self = this;
setTimeout(function(){
    self.catch();
},1000);
share|improve this answer
    
You really shouldn't create a new, global object when you can keep a local reference. –  Quentin Apr 17 '12 at 14:55
    
This won't work anyway. this isn't the variable you want (because the scope has changed) and strings don't have a catch method. –  Quentin Apr 17 '12 at 14:57

use a closure

obj.prototype.do = function()
{ 
     window.setTimeout((function(that){
        return function(){
            that.catch();
        };
     })(this),1000);
     alert('called');
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no need to introduce another anonymous function when we can just create a locally scoped variable in the do function. –  Quentin Apr 17 '12 at 14:58
    
@Quentin: Funny, that's exactly what Neals' example does (if you imagine obj.prototype.do = function(){} around his code), yet you criticize him for that .. I guess somebody is hunting for acceptance here ;-) –  micha Apr 18 '12 at 15:24

Why go through all of this effort, just pass the function.

function obj() {
    this.a;
}
obj.prototype.
catch = function() {
    alert('Catched')
}
obj.prototype.do = function() {
    setTimeout(this.
    catch, 1000);
}

var test = new obj();
test.do();​
share|improve this answer
    
This will break the reference to the object that is available inside catch via the this keyword. The example code doesn't use it, but it is clearly a heavily simplified example (since the function does nothing except fire an alert) and the real code probably depends on it. –  Quentin Apr 17 '12 at 15:00

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