Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have 3 classes. They have all similar integers, methods etc...

class Country{

      int a,b;
public:
      Country();
      void doSomething();
      :
      :
}

class Military : public Country {
public:
      Power();
      void doAnother();
      void doAnother2();
      :
      :
}

class Technology : public Military{
public:
      Technology();
      void doAnother3();
      :
      :
}

Assume that this inheritance suits my solution. But as you see, when i create Military from Country, there is not a relation between them logically. I mean, military is not a country. Also for Technology from country, the problem is same. Technology is not a Military nor Country.

Anyway, that solution is okay for me, it shortens my code, but if i do this, do i betray Object Oriented Programming Philosophy? Is it a contradicton?

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! For your specific doSomething (tax()? signTreaty()?), does it make sense to say Technology tech; tech.doSomething()? If not, then this inheritance does not suit your solution. – Robᵩ Apr 17 '12 at 15:02
1  
FWIW, it looks like you are trying to construct a Military with Power. While that may be philosophically true, it isn't value C++. – Robᵩ Apr 17 '12 at 15:04
    
Yes… not even typedef Military Power; will fix that in the view of C++. – Potatoswatter Apr 17 '12 at 15:06
    
Okay. I understand. Thank you. – vkx Apr 17 '12 at 20:07
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, it's against OOP. You relationships are has-a, not is-a.

You should use composition instead of inheritance for this.

class Country{
      Military m;  //Country has-a military
      int a,b;
public:
      Country();
      void doSomething();
}

class Military{
      Technology t; //Military has-a technology
public:
      Military();
      void doAnother();
      void doAnother2();
}

class Technology{
public:
      Technology();
      void doAnother3();
}
share|improve this answer

All of these inheritance relationships are false. A country "has a" military, and a military "has" technology. Therefore they should be members. Inheritance is for "is a" relationships.

If you subvert the intended meaning of language constructs, you will probably pay for it later.

share|improve this answer

It is a wrong design
When you are inheriting some class its an is-a relationship. and inheritance is not code reuse

You can establish an has-a relationship for the behaviors that are common with them.

such as a keyboard has buttons, also my shirt has. but my shirt is not a keyboard.
so It should be designed as shirt has buttons and keyboards has buttons too.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.