Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a situation with a CASE query in PostgreSQL.

My table ("statut_existenta_pf") looks like the one in the image here http://cl.ly/0L1Q2f3v3L0s3V1p3P3X

I wrote the following query which is supposed to match a result from that table:

SELECT p.*, se.se_id_statut, ne.ne_denumire
  FROM persoane_fizice p,
       statut_existenta_pf se,
       nom_statut_existenta ne
  WHERE p.pf_id = :id_pf
    AND se.se_id_pf = p.pf_id
    AND se.se_id_statut IN 
        (CASE 
           WHEN se_data_inceput IS NULL THEN
             (SELECT se_id_statut FROM statut_existenta_pf
                WHERE se_id_pf = :id_pf
                ORDER BY se_id DESC LIMIT 1)
           WHEN se_data_inceput IS NOT NULL AND se_data_sfarsit IS NULL THEN
             (SELECT se_id_statut FROM statut_existenta_pf
                WHERE se_id_pf = :id_pf
                ORDER BY se_id DESC LIMIT 1)
           ELSE
             (SELECT se_id_statut FROM statut_existenta_pf
                WHERE se_id_pf = :id_pf
                  AND CURRENT_DATE BETWEEN se_data_inceput AND se_data_sfarsit)
        END) 
    AND se.se_id_statut = ne.ne_id

The thing is I get 0 results and I should return one result, the one where "se_data_inceput" is '2010-03-31' and "se_data_sfarsit" is null.

Any ideas?

Thank you.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

It looks like you're keeping time-based object instances in the statut_existenta_pf table.

I've used the following testbed:

CREATE TABLE statut_existenta_pf (
    se_id                   int4,
    se_id_pf                int4,
    se_id_statut            int2,
    se_data_inceput         date,
    se_data_sfarsit         date
); -- the rest fields are irrelevant for this example
CREATE TABLE nom_statut_existenta (
    id           int2,
    ne_denumire  varchar(30)
); -- my wild guess bout this table
CREATE TABLE persoane_fizice (
    pf_id           int4,
    pf_name         varchar(60)
); --- same here, irrelevant for the example

with the following test data:

INSERT INTO nom_statut_existenta VALUES
    (1, 'Status: Vive'), (2, 'Status: Morto');
INSERT INTO persoane_fizice VALUES (3489, 'Giuseppe Garibaldi');
INSERT INTO statut_existenta_pf VALUES
    (4275, 3489, 2, '2012-04-18', '2012-05-18'),
    (3669, 3489, 1, '2010-03-31', NULL);

Now, you're searching for the current object in this time-based series. Your logic seems to be the following:

  1. if se_data_inceput is NULL (I treat this column as instance_start_date), then get the value of the most recent revision for the given persoane_fizice;
  2. if se_data_sfarsit is NULL (instance_end_date I believe) then again, get the value of the most recent revision;
  3. if both columns are NOT NULL, then get the value for the revision falling between such dates.

You've mentioned nothing bout the constraints in your setup, but I assume it is illegal to have several entries with overlapping date ranges.

Here's how I rewrote your initial query, yielding proper results:

WITH max_se_id AS (
SELECT se_id_pf, max(se_id) se_id_max FROM statut_existenta_pf
 GROUP BY se_id_pf
)
SELECT p.*, se.se_id_statut, ne.ne_denumire
  FROM persoane_fizice p
  JOIN statut_existenta_pf se ON se.se_id_pf = p.pf_id
  JOIN nom_statut_existenta ne ON ne.id = se.se_id_statut
  JOIN max_se_id mse ON se.se_id_pf = mse.se_id_pf
 WHERE p.pf_id = :id_pf
   AND se.se_id_statut IN 
    (CASE 
       WHEN se_data_inceput IS NULL THEN mse.se_id_max
       WHEN se_data_inceput IS NOT NULL AND se_data_sfarsit IS NULL THEN mse.se_id_max
       ELSE se_id_statut
    END) ;

But this query yields incorrect results, for the given testbed it will return the revision with the highest se_id, despite the fact it has start time in the future.

I'm using the same approach to keep history of objects in the database and I recommend using such query instead:

SELECT p.*, se.se_id_statut, ne.ne_denumire
  FROM persoane_fizice p
  JOIN statut_existenta_pf se ON se.se_id_pf = p.pf_id
  JOIN nom_statut_existenta ne ON ne.id = se.se_id_statut
 WHERE p.pf_id = :id_pf
   AND statement_timestamp() BETWEEN coalesce(se.se_data_inceput, now())
       AND coalesce(se.se_data_sfarsit, clock_timestamp());

If you have non-overlapping dates in the se_data_inceput + se_data_sfarsit columns, this query will yield the currently active row.

I'm using:

  • now() as a default value for the se_data_inceput, this yields the start time of current transaction;
  • statement_timestamp() as a current point in time and
  • clock_timestamp() as a default for the se_data_sfarsit.

With this combination you can always expect your query to return the current object instance from the history table.

I hope my assumptions were right.

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure CASE can return a list, which you are getting in the ELSE part, maybe someone else can enlighten us. In the meantime, I think you can put the se.se_id_statut IN part inside the CASE:

AND 
    (CASE 
       WHEN se_data_inceput IS NULL THEN
         se.se_id_statut IN (SELECT se_id_statut FROM statut_existenta_pf
            WHERE se_id_pf = :id_pf
            ORDER BY se_id DESC LIMIT 1)
       WHEN se_data_inceput IS NOT NULL AND se_data_sfarsit IS NULL THEN
         se.se_id_statut IN (SELECT se_id_statut FROM statut_existenta_pf
            WHERE se_id_pf = :id_pf
            ORDER BY se_id DESC LIMIT 1)
       ELSE
         se.se_id_statut IN  (SELECT se_id_statut FROM statut_existenta_pf
            WHERE se_id_pf = :id_pf
              AND CURRENT_DATE BETWEEN se_data_inceput AND se_data_sfarsit)
    END) 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.