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I search for a good way to copy a file (binary or text). I've written several samples, everyone works. But I want hear the opinion of seasoned programmers.

I missing good examples and search a way which works with C++.

ANSI-C-WAY

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>    // fopen, fclose, fread, fwrite, BUFSIZ
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    clock_t start, end;
    start = clock();

    // BUFSIZE default is 8192 bytes
    // BUFSIZE of 1 means one chareter at time
    // good values should fit to blocksize, like 1024 or 4096
    // higher values reduce number of system calls
    // size_t BUFFER_SIZE = 4096;

    char buf[BUFSIZ];
    size_t size;

    FILE* source = fopen("from.ogv", "rb");
    FILE* dest = fopen("to.ogv", "wb");

    // clean and more secure
    // feof(FILE* stream) returns non-zero if the end of file indicator for stream is set

    while (size = fread(buf, 1, BUFSIZ, source)) {
        fwrite(buf, 1, size, dest);
    }

    fclose(source);
    fclose(dest);

    end = clock();

    cout << "CLOCKS_PER_SEC " << CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME START " << start << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END " << end << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END - START " << end - start << "\n";
    cout << "TIME(SEC) " << static_cast<double>(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";

    return 0;
}

POSIX-WAY (K&R use this in "The C programming language", more low-level)

#include <iostream>
#include <fcntl.h>   // open
#include <unistd.h>  // read, write, close
#include <cstdio>    // BUFSIZ
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    clock_t start, end;
    start = clock();

    // BUFSIZE defaults to 8192
    // BUFSIZE of 1 means one chareter at time
    // good values should fit to blocksize, like 1024 or 4096
    // higher values reduce number of system calls
    // size_t BUFFER_SIZE = 4096;

    char buf[BUFSIZ];
    size_t size;

    int source = open("from.ogv", O_RDONLY, 0);
    int dest = open("to.ogv", O_WRONLY | O_CREAT /*| O_TRUNC/**/, 0644);

    while ((size = read(source, buf, BUFSIZ)) > 0) {
        write(dest, buf, size);
    }

    close(source);
    close(dest);

    end = clock();

    cout << "CLOCKS_PER_SEC " << CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME START " << start << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END " << end << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END - START " << end - start << "\n";
    cout << "TIME(SEC) " << static_cast<double>(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";

    return 0;
}

KISS-C++-Streambuffer-WAY

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    clock_t start, end;
    start = clock();

    ifstream source("from.ogv", ios::binary);
    ofstream dest("to.ogv", ios::binary);

    dest << source.rdbuf();

    source.close();
    dest.close();

    end = clock();

    cout << "CLOCKS_PER_SEC " << CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME START " << start << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END " << end << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END - START " <<  end - start << "\n";
    cout << "TIME(SEC) " << static_cast<double>(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";

    return 0;
}

COPY-ALGORITHM-C++-WAY

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <ctime>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    clock_t start, end;
    start = clock();

    ifstream source("from.ogv", ios::binary);
    ofstream dest("to.ogv", ios::binary);

    istreambuf_iterator<char> begin_source(source);
    istreambuf_iterator<char> end_source;
    ostreambuf_iterator<char> begin_dest(dest); 
    copy(begin_source, end_source, begin_dest);

    source.close();
    dest.close();

    end = clock();

    cout << "CLOCKS_PER_SEC " << CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME START " << start << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END " << end << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END - START " <<  end - start << "\n";
    cout << "TIME(SEC) " << static_cast<double>(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";

    return 0;
}

OWN-BUFFER-C++-WAY

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    clock_t start, end;
    start = clock();

    ifstream source("from.ogv", ios::binary);
    ofstream dest("to.ogv", ios::binary);

    // file size
    source.seekg(0, ios::end);
    ifstream::pos_type size = source.tellg();
    source.seekg(0);
    // allocate memory for buffer
    char* buffer = new char[size];

    // copy file    
    source.read(buffer, size);
    dest.write(buffer, size);

    // clean up
    delete[] buffer;
    source.close();
    dest.close();

    end = clock();

    cout << "CLOCKS_PER_SEC " << CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME START " << start << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END " << end << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END - START " <<  end - start << "\n";
    cout << "TIME(SEC) " << static_cast<double>(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";

    return 0;
}

LINUX-WAY // requires kernel >= 2.6.33

#include <iostream>
#include <sys/sendfile.h>  // sendfile
#include <fcntl.h>         // open
#include <unistd.h>        // close
#include <sys/stat.h>      // fstat
#include <sys/types.h>     // fstat
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    clock_t start, end;
    start = clock();

    int source = open("from.ogv", O_RDONLY, 0);
    int dest = open("to.ogv", O_WRONLY | O_CREAT /*| O_TRUNC/**/, 0644);

    // struct required, rationale: function stat() exists also
    struct stat stat_source;
    fstat(source, &stat_source);

    sendfile(dest, source, 0, stat_source.st_size);

    close(source);
    close(dest);

    end = clock();

    cout << "CLOCKS_PER_SEC " << CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME START " << start << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END " << end << "\n";
    cout << "CPU-TIME END - START " <<  end - start << "\n";
    cout << "TIME(SEC) " << static_cast<double>(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n";

    return 0;
}

Environment

  • GNU/LINUX (Archlinux)
  • Kernel 3.3
  • GLIBC-2.15, LIBSTDC++ 4.7 (GCC-LIBS), GCC 4.7, Coreutils 8.16
  • Using RUNLEVEL 3 (Multiuser, Network, Terminal, no GUI)
  • INTEL SSD-Postville 80 GB, filled up to 50%
  • Copy a 270 MB OGG-VIDEO-FILE

Steps ro reproduce

 1. $ rm from.ogg
 2. $ reboot                           # kernel and filesystem buffers are in regular
 3. $ (time ./program) &>> report.txt  # executes program, redirects output of program and append to file
 4. $ sha256sum *.ogv                  # checksum
 5. $ rm to.ogg                        # remove copy, but no sync, kernel and fileystem buffers are used
 6. $ (time ./program) &>> report.txt  # executes program, redirects output of program and append to file

Results (CPU TIME used)

Program  Description                 UNBUFFERED|BUFFERED
ANSI C   (fread/frwite)                 490,000|260,000  
POSIX    (K&R, read/write)              450,000|230,000  
FSTREAM  (KISS, Streambuffer)           500,000|270,000 
FSTREAM  (Algorithm, copy)              500,000|270,000
FSTREAM  (OWN-BUFFER)                   500,000|340,000  
SENDFILE (native LINUX, sendfile)       410,000|200,000  

Filesize doesn't change.
sha256sum print the same results.
The video file is still playable.

Questions

  • What method would you prefer?
  • Do you know better solutions?
  • Do you see any mistakes in my code?
  • Do you know a reason to avoid a solution?

  • FSTREAM (KISS, Streambuffer)
    I really like this one, because it is really short and simple. As far is I know the operator << is overloaded for rdbuf() and doesn't convert anything. Correct?

Thanks

Update 1
I changed the source in all samples in that way, that the open and close of the file descriptors is include in the measurement of clock(). Their are no other significant changes in the source code. The results doesn't changed! I also used time to double-check my results.

Update 2
ANSI C sample changed: The condition of the while-loop doesn't call any longer feof() instead I moved fread() into the condition. It looks like, the code runs now 10,000 clocks faster.

Measurement changed: The former results were always buffered, because I repeated the old command line rm to.ogv && sync && time ./program for each program a few times. Now I reboot the system for every program. The unbuffered results are new and show no surprise. The unbuffered results didn't changed really.

If i don't delete the old copy, the programs react different. Overwriting a existing file buffered is faster with POSIX and SENDFILE, all other programs are slower. Maybe the options truncate or create have a impact on this behaviour. But overwriting existing files with the same copy is not a real world use-case.

Performing the copy with cp takes 0.44 seconds unbuffered und 0.30 seconds buffered. So cp is a little bit slower than the POSIX sample. Looks fine for me.

Maybe I add also samples and results of mmap() and copy_file() from boost::filesystem.

Update 3
I've put this also on a blog page and extended it a little bit. Including splice(), which is a low-level function from the Linux kernel. Maybe more samples with Java will follow. http://www.ttyhoney.com/blog/?page_id=69

share|improve this question
3  
fstream definitely is a good option for file operations. –  chris Apr 17 '12 at 16:40
1  
richelbilderbeek.nl/CppCopy_file.htm –  Anycorn Apr 17 '12 at 16:41
7  
You forgot the lazy way: system("cp from.ogv to.ogv"); –  fbafelipe Apr 17 '12 at 16:45
1  
#include <copyfile.h> copyfile(const char *from, const char *to, copyfile_state_t state, copyfile_flags_t flags); –  Loki Astari Apr 17 '12 at 16:53
1  
Why are you only taking the time to copy the files, and not the open/close time? If you're doing a number of iterations of this, the startup/shutdown time for each time you copy something could matter quite a lot. –  Kevin Anderson Apr 17 '12 at 17:05
show 8 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Copy a file in a sane way:

 int main()
 {
     std::ifstream  src("from.ogv", std::ios::binary);
     std::ofstream  dst("to.ogv",   std::ios::binary);

     dst << src.rdbuf();
 }

This is so simple and intuitive to read it is worth the extra cost. If we was doing it a lot I would fall back to OS calls to the file system. I am sure boost has a copy file method in its filesystem class.

There is always the C libraries for interacting with file system:

 #include <copyfile.h>

 int
 copyfile(const char *from, const char *to, copyfile_state_t state, copyfile_flags_t flags);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Didn't know copyfile! I will test it! –  Peter Apr 17 '12 at 17:08
7  
copyfile is not portable; I think it's specific to Mac OS X. It certainly doesn't exist on Linux. boost::filesystem::copy_file is probably the most portable way to copy a file via the native file system. –  Mike Seymour Apr 17 '12 at 17:35
1  
@MikeSeymour: copyfile() seems to be a BSD extension. –  Loki Astari Apr 17 '12 at 17:47
1  
@Vincent: Yes. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/12766636/… –  Loki Astari Oct 8 '12 at 4:13
1  
@duedl0r: Yes. But that's like saying "if the sun sets". You can run really fast west and you may make your day slightly longer but the sun is going to set. Unless you have bug and leak memory (it will go out of scope). But since there is no dynamic memory management here there can not be a leak and they will go out of scope (just like the sun will set). –  Loki Astari Jun 13 '13 at 15:29
show 16 more comments

Too many!

The "ANSI C" way buffer is redundant, since a FILE is already buffered. (The size of this internal buffer is what BUFSIZ actually defines.)

The "OWN-BUFFER-C++-WAY" will be slow as it goes through fstream, which does a lot of virtual dispatching, and again maintains internal buffers or each stream object. (The "COPY-ALGORITHM-C++-WAY" does not suffer this, as the streambuf_iterator class bypasses the stream layer.)

I prefer the "COPY-ALGORITHM-C++-WAY", but without constructing an fstream, just create bare std::filebuf instances when no actual formatting is needed.

For raw performance, you can't beat POSIX file descriptors. It's ugly but portable and fast on any platform.

The Linux way appears to be incredibly fast — perhaps the OS let the function return before I/O was finished? In any case, that's not portable enough for many applications.

EDIT: Ah, "native Linux" may be improving performance by interleaving reads and writes with asynchronous I/O. Letting commands pile up can help the disk driver decide when is best to seek. You might try Boost Asio or pthreads for comparison. As for "can't beat POSIX file descriptors"… well that's true if you're doing anything with the data, not just blindly copying.

share|improve this answer
    
ANSI C: But I have to give the function fread/fwrite a size? pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/toc.htm –  Peter Apr 17 '12 at 17:00
    
@PeterWeber Well, yes, it's true that BUFSIZ is as good a value as any, and will probably speed things up relative to one or "just a few" characters at a time. Anyway, the performance measurement bears out that it's not the best method in any case. –  Potatoswatter Apr 17 '12 at 17:03
    
I have not a in-depth understanding of this, so I should be careful with assumptions and opinions. Linux-Way runs in Kernelspace afaik. This should avoid slow Context-Switching between Kernelspace and Userspace? Tomorrow I will take again a look at the manpage of sendfile. A while ago Linus Torvalds said he doesn't like Userspace-Filesystems for heavy jobs. Maybe sendfile is a positive example for his view? –  Peter Apr 17 '12 at 21:05
3  
"sendfile() copies data between one file descriptor and another. Because this copying is done within the kernel, sendfile() is more efficient than the combination of read(2) and write(2), which would require transferring data to and from user space.": kernel.org/doc/man-pages/online/pages/man2/sendfile.2.html –  Max Lybbert Oct 8 '12 at 21:52
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