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i am trying to get all subscribers of a user

my query:

SELECT
    COUNT(sub.id) as ids
FROM
    subscribers as sub
WHERE
    suid=541839243781

EXPLAIN prints:

╔════╦═════════════╦═══════╦══════╦═══════════════╦═════╦═════════╦═══════╦═══════╦═════════════╗
║ id ║ select_type ║ table ║ type ║ possible_keys ║ key ║ key_len ║  ref  ║ rows  ║    Extra    ║
╠════╬═════════════╬═══════╬══════╬═══════════════╬═════╬═════════╬═══════╬═══════╬═════════════╣
║  1 ║ SIMPLE      ║ sub   ║ ref  ║ i3            ║ i3  ║       8 ║ const ║ 47890 ║ Using index ║
╚════╩═════════════╩═══════╩══════╩═══════════════╩═════╩═════════╩═══════╩═══════╩═════════════╝

so at the moment the total count i get is around 48k and it takes 0.0333 to load... what if this goes up to 1m or 5m ?? then it could take ages to load up...

my indexes on subscribers table are:

╔═════════════╦════════════╦═══════════════════╦══════════════╦═════════════╦═══════════╦═════════════╦══════════╦════════╦══════╦════════════╦═════════╗
║    Table    ║ Non_unique ║     Key_name      ║ Seq_in_index ║ Column_name ║ Collation ║ Cardinality ║ Sub_part ║ Packed ║ Null ║ Index_type ║ Comment ║
╠═════════════╬════════════╬═══════════════════╬══════════════╬═════════════╬═══════════╬═════════════╬══════════╬════════╬══════╬════════════╬═════════╣
║ subscribers ║          0 ║ PRIMARY           ║            1 ║ id          ║ A         ║       60251 ║ NULL     ║ NULL   ║      ║ BTREE      ║         ║
║ subscribers ║          1 ║ total_subscribers ║            1 ║ id          ║ A         ║       60251 ║ NULL     ║ NULL   ║      ║ BTREE      ║         ║
║ subscribers ║          1 ║ total_subscribers ║            2 ║ suid        ║ A         ║       60251 ║ NULL     ║ NULL   ║      ║ BTREE      ║         ║
║ subscribers ║          1 ║ i3                ║            1 ║ suid        ║ A         ║        6025 ║ NULL     ║ NULL   ║      ║ BTREE      ║         ║
║ subscribers ║          1 ║ i3                ║            2 ║ uid         ║ A         ║       60251 ║ NULL     ║ NULL   ║      ║ BTREE      ║         ║
║ subscribers ║          1 ║ i3                ║            3 ║ id          ║ A         ║       60251 ║ NULL     ║ NULL   ║      ║ BTREE      ║         ║
╚═════════════╩════════════╩═══════════════════╩══════════════╩═════════════╩═══════════╩═════════════╩══════════╩════════╩══════╩════════════╩═════════╝

so how can i make this query more efficient?

share|improve this question
    
If I'm reading data correctly you don't have dedicated index for "suid" column. Is "suid" column values unique globally or only for each subscriber? –  Vadim Ponomarev Apr 17 '12 at 17:27
    
edited indexes, forgot one index –  fxuser Apr 17 '12 at 17:33

3 Answers 3

You probably can't.

That said, I would expect the COUNT operation to necessarily scale linearly with the number of rows. You may find that with 1 million rows it takes 0.12 seconds instead of 0.0333 seconds.

If and when it actually becomes a problem, you might be able to use pre-calculation and caching to solve this. For example you might have an hourly job that calculates the counts and stores them on an table. Your counts could be up to an hour out of date, but retrieving them will be much faster.

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You can join sys.tables to sys.partitions. Row stats are stored there for the table.

Err: this applies to MS SQL Server, sorry should have mentioned that.

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Does the column id allow NULL values? If not, change to SELECT COUNT(*) and the engine will be able to answer the query from the index alone without reference to the table data. This should speed things up and, depending on how MySQL stores and retrieves cardinality statistics, could make the query instantaneous.

share|improve this answer
    
id is an AUTO_INCREMENT column but it doesnt seem to speed up things... i still get the same speed –  fxuser Apr 17 '12 at 17:45
    
You'll need a large data set to test in order to see how the query time changes with total count. Try creating 5 million rows and testing against that. –  Larry Lustig Apr 17 '12 at 17:47
    
on 1.2m rows it takes 0.2 secs so i guess on 5m it will take around 1-1.5 secs... cant this be scaled down to like 0.002 or something like that?? how other sites get such numbers from db so fast?do they store them somewhere and increase/decrease their count instead whenever a new record is created/deleted? –  fxuser Apr 19 '12 at 12:56
    
If you have an index on suid and are doing COUNT(*) or COUNT(suid) then you have given MySQL as much juice to answer the question quickly as you can. For more speed you will have to maintain a pre-computed table of suids and their matching counts. –  Larry Lustig Apr 19 '12 at 13:21

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