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I have problem with giving new char valure to array. I don't know why I get sign "<" even when n is 12? My program should change expression int char* tab = "93+" to one value in this case 12.

    char* tab = "93+";
    int b = sizeof (tab);
    char* tmp = new char[b] ;
    tmp [b-1] = '\0';


if(isdigit(tab[i]) && isdigit(tab[i+1]) ){
               int n;             
               if(tab[i+2]=='+' || tab[i+2]=='-' || tab[i+2]=='*'){

                  switch(tab[i+2]){
                    case '+':   
                    n = (tab[i]-'0') + (tab[i+1]-'0');

                    break;

                    case '-':
                    n = (tab[i]-'0') - (tab[i+1]-'0');
                    break;

                    case '*':
                    n = (tab[i]-'0') * (tab[i+1]-'0');
                    break;
                  }
                  tmp[i] = n+'0'; // I should have 12 but I get <
               }

               else if (tab[i+2]!='+' || tab[i+2]!='-' || tab[i+2]!='*'){
                     goto LAB;
               }
}
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2  
Just so you know, sizeof(tab) will always be the size of a pointer, not the number of characters it points to, so that's wrong. sizeof(some_array) will give you the number of elements, sizeof(char*) is what you are doing. –  Ed S. Apr 17 '12 at 18:04
1  
So use strlen(tab). Also strings given in "" are automatically '\0' delimited. –  Bartek Banachewicz Apr 17 '12 at 18:07
1  
There's a very high probability you can use something better than a goto. –  chris Apr 17 '12 at 18:09
    
@0A0D ideone.com/voIEB I guess you were wrong. –  Bartek Banachewicz Apr 17 '12 at 18:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is in this line:

tmp[i] = n+'0'; // I should have 12 but I get <

n is 12, but 12 + '0' != '12', since '12' isn't a character. You're putting into tmp[i] the char whose ascii value is 12 more than '0', which is '<'.
I believe declaring (and treating) tmp as an int would be better for your purposes.

Also note that sizeof (tab) is the same as sizeof (char *), and not sizeof ("93+"), so you're likely to always get b==4 (in 32-bit machines).

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I try to write: (char)n or jut n but it is same effect. –  mathewM Apr 17 '12 at 18:26
    
As it should be - the casting happens automatically. However, '12' isn't a character. If you look at an ascii table, you'll see that '0' == 48, which means that '0' + 12 == 60, and '<' == 60. Here's an ascii table as an example: asciitable.com/index/asciifull.gif –  Eran Zimmerman Apr 17 '12 at 18:32

You indeed should get '<'. Here is why: tmp is an array of chars. You calculated n to be 12. This is correct. You then added '0' which is 48. 48 + 12 = 60. So you store 60 in tmp[i]. An ASCII 60 is '<'.

You could use an int tmp, and not add the '0', and you would get then 12 in tmp[i].

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