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Instead of executing:

SELECT a
FROM b
WHERE a LIKE 'a%'
OR a LIKE 'b%'
OR a LIKE 'c%'


is there a way to execute something functioning like this pseudocode?

SELECT a
FROM b
WHERE a IN ('a%', 'b%', 'c%')

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2  
May I ask what is wrong with the first syntax that you'd like to avoid using it? –  JohnFx Jun 19 '09 at 19:55
    
Because it involves a lot of redundant typing and introduction of logical operators, and when I glance at something containing numerous parentheses & ORs it is less digestible. –  JonathanWolfson Jun 23 '09 at 13:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Might be too specific to your example, but you could do LIKE '[a-c]%'. Other than that, I'm not aware of any LIKE-like IN syntax

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2  
You could also do '[abce]%' if you wanted to skip a letter (in this example d) –  Nathan Koop Jun 19 '09 at 20:07
    
if the list for IN operator is result of a query then how to do? –  siri Oct 11 '11 at 4:34

You could dump your criteria values into a temp table (without the wildcard). Then do a join like:

SELECT b.a FROM b INNER JOIN #likevals on b.a LIKE #likevals.value + '%'

WHERE #likevals looks like:

value
------
a
b
c
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Alternatively, the wildcard could appear the the 'temp' table values to offer greater flexibility. –  onedaywhen Nov 25 '11 at 8:41

You could use

SELECT a
FROM b
WHERE a >= 'A'
AND a < 'D'

which would assure you the best use of an index on a.

I bet the other answer will give you an index scan or table scan.

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+1 for possible index use! –  n8wrl Jun 19 '09 at 20:00
    
I have no idea you could do this. Thanks. I think you'd want to place a comment in the code, I could see people misunderstanding this clause. –  Nathan Koop Jun 19 '09 at 20:03

Just spotted this. There are many ways to solve it, but here's one flexible method you can use with reporting solutions. I just happened to be given the same problem to solve in the past, and never pass on a problem ;o). Apologies in advance if this doesn't parse - chucked in and fiddled with from memory, but you should get the idea

CREATE FUNCTION fn_PatList (@PatList VARCHAR(200))
RETURNS @SearchList TABLE (Pattern VARCHAR(100))
AS 
BEGIN
 WHILE @PatList LIKE '%,%'
 BEGIN
  SELECT @PatList = LTRIM(RTRIM(@PatList))
  INSERT INTO @SearchList
   SELECT RTRIM(LEFT(@PatList,PATINDEX('%,%',@PatList)-1))
  SELECT @PatList = SUBSTRING(@PatListmPATINDEX('%,%',@PatList)+1, 8000)
 END
 INSERT INTO @SearchList 
  SELECT LTRIM(RTRIM(@PatList))
 RETURN
END

That's the general gist - apologies for any errors so far. Bits to do shortly.

Now..

SELECT Names.Person
FROM Names
INNER JOIN Fn_PatList ('Fred%,John%') PatList
ON Names.Person LIKE PatList.Pattern

You might want to allow for spaces ie blanks between commas and various other junk. In short though, you can now use your function to cater for lists of patterns. Hopefully that satisfies your requirements - pretty easy to work with. Might want to consider indexation too but you can pick it up from there.

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No. The IN operator expects actual values. The closest you could get is something like:

Select a
from b 
where a in (
    select a 
    from b
    WHERE a LIKE 'a%'
    OR a LIKE 'b%'
    OR a LIKE 'c%')

Except that just duplicates your efforts for this particular case, so I wouldn't use the above code. Essentially, you need to pass in the actual values into your IN statement. The takeaway here is that you can use a select statement inside an IN statement to get your values.

Also, I am operating on the assumption here that you are not trying to select literal values 'a', 'b', 'c', etc., and that these value represent some other string that you don't care to show us.

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I had same issue, I had to write a script for it. (If its still on your minds)

here is what i ended up using:

 DECLARE @User INT, @MaskCount INT
     SET @User = 1
     Select @MaskCount = COUNT(*) from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks

     WHILE (@User <= @MaskCount)
        Begin

        DECLARE @ProntoUserID Nvarchar (12)
        Set @ProntoUserID = (select Distinct [USER_ID] from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User)

        DECLARE @DB Nvarchar (3)
        Set @DB = (select Distinct DB_Code from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User)


        DECLARE @TopFlag INT
        SET @TopFlag = 1

            Drop Table #UserMasks 
            Drop Table #UserMasks1 

            Create Table #UserMasks
            ([RN] [Int] NOT NULL,
            [DB] [Nvarchar] (3) NOT NULL,
            [Mask] [Nvarchar](10) NOT NULL)

            Create Table #UserMasks1
            ([DB] [Nvarchar] (3) NOT NULL,
            [Mask] [Nvarchar](10) NOT NULL)

            Insert Into #UserMasks1 

                select @DB ,PD_Mk_1  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_1 is not NULL
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_2  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_2  is not null and DB_Code = @DB
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_3  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_3  is not null and DB_Code = @DB
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_4  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_4  is not null and DB_Code = @DB
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_5  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_5  is not null and DB_Code = @DB
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_6  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_6  is not null and DB_Code = @DB
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_7  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_7  is not null and DB_Code = @DB
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_8  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_8  is not null and DB_Code = @DB
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_9  from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_9  is not null and DB_Code = @DB
                Union All select @DB ,PD_Mk_10 from BI.dbo.ALL_Access_Masks where [ID] = @User and PD_Mk_10 is not null and DB_Code = @DB


            Insert Into #UserMasks

                Select ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY @DB ORDER BY Mask DESC) AS RN,DB,Mask from #UserMasks1
                where DB = @DB


        WHILE (@TopFlag <=(select COUNT(*) from #UserMasks))

                        BEGIN

                            Insert Into BI.dbo.Masked_Users
                            select @DB,@ProntoUserID,'PD' as 'Mask_Type',Code
                            from BI.dbo.Mask_Lookup M
                            where code like (select Mask + '%' from #UserMasks Where RN = @TopFlag)
                            and [Database] = @DB and M.Mask = 'PD'

        SET @TopFlag = @TopFlag + 1

                    End

        SET @User = @User + 1

End

GO
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Your answer came after the accepted answer and seems like a much more complicated way of solving the same problem. Is there any advantage to your answer over the accepted one? –  Ryan Gates Nov 6 '12 at 1:55

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