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i have a graph which consists of nodes, and i need a fast algorithm that generates a random path between two nodes. i designed several algorithms from scratch for this want but can't seem to get it right.

either the algorithm gets stuck in loops, or when i keep record of the visited nodes it sometimes gets stuck between visited nodes. another problem i encountered is that my algorithm was too unstable in performance.

so my question is; does anyone knows a fast and stable algorithm for a random path between two reachable nodes in an undirected graph?

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What do you mean by "random?" You could get very different distributions depending on what you want. Do you mean "sampled uniformly from all possible paths between the nodes?" Or "a whole bunch of different paths from one node to the other, even if they're not statistically random?" –  templatetypedef Apr 17 '12 at 19:59
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Let your graph be G=(V,E). Create a subset U of V such that U = { u | there is a path from u to the target }.

  • Note that finding this subset U is easy - and can be done in linear time using DFS or BFS on the reversed edges from the target.

Using this subset, create a graph G'=(U,E') where U is defined above and E' = E [intersection] UxU [The same edges, but applied only on vertices in U].

Run randomized (choosing which vertex to explore next on random) DFS on G' until you reach the target.

  • Note - the idea is to find a path - not necesseraly simple, and thus you shouldn't maintain a visited set.
  • You might add a "break rule" that if you reach a certain depth, you will seek the target - unrandomised, to avoid infinite loops in circles.
  • Perofrmance is expected to be varying, since it is linear in the length of the found path, which might be very long or very short...
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that was my first taught –  Luka Rahne Apr 17 '12 at 20:13
    
This won't be very uniform. If the graph is directed, perhaps you could do some dynamic programming to count the number of paths available as a result of each dfs choice, and usse that to even it out –  Thomas Ahle Mar 18 '13 at 0:12
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If I understand your question correctly, you are trying to generate a uniform spanning tree.

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It depends on what you mean by random. If you don't care what it means, have you tried a monte-carlo method?

My wild stab in the dark, pseudo-code, assuming that target is reachable at all, and that you have an undirected graph.

1. s <- start node
2. Choose a random neighbor of s, call that neighbor n.
3. Add the edge from s to n to the path.
4. Set s <- n.
5. Go to 2, unless you've reached the target.

The caveats of amit hold here, too:

  • You might add a "break rule" that if you reach a certain depth, you will seek the target - unrandomised, to avoid infinite loops in circles.
  • Perofrmance is expected to be varying, since it is linear in the length of the found path, which might be very long or very short...
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What if in some point n does not have any path to the target? you will get stuck in an infinite loop. –  amit Apr 17 '12 at 20:10
    
Added reachability as a precondition. It's easy enough to fix if the precondition doesn't hold. –  nes1983 Apr 17 '12 at 20:11
    
i tried this one, but the problem was that it was too unstable. sometimes it was very slow. –  Marnix v. R. Apr 17 '12 at 20:17
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