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Do Ruby hashes have a method like reject! that returns matching items and leaves only non-matching ones in the hash? For instance:

planets = {'Mars' => 2, 'Jupiter' => 63, 'Saturn' => 47}

few_moons = planets.some_method! do |planet, moon_count|
  moon_count < 50
end

few_moons #=> {'Mars'  => 2, 'Saturn' => 47}
planets   #=> {'Jupiter' => 63}

reject! returns the original hash, minus the rejected items. partition is close, but it returns arrays of tuples, not hashes, and doesn't modify the original hash.

I don't see anything like this in the docs, and wanted to ask around before rolling my own.

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I think partition is closest, and not much work to wrap to suit your needs. –  Mladen Jablanović Apr 17 '12 at 20:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
few_moons, many_moons = 
  planets.partition { |planet, moon_count| moon_count < 50 } \
  .map{ |v| Hash[v] }
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Nice: Hash['Jupiter', 63] #=> {"Jupiter"=>63} –  Nathan Long Apr 17 '12 at 20:46
    
In this case Hash[[['Jupiter', 63], ...]] #=> {"Jupiter"=>63, ...} –  Victor Moroz Apr 17 '12 at 20:48

One workaround is to use a Proc twice:

moon_filter = Proc.new {|planet, moon_count| moon_count < 50 }
few_moons   = planets.select(&moon_filter)
lotsa_moons = planets.reject(&moon_filter)
planets     = lotsa_moons
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There's also Enumerable#group_by:

planets_with = planets.group_by do |planet, moon_count|
  moon_count < 50 ? :many_moons : :few_moons
end

few  = planets_with[:few_moons]
many = planets_with[:many_moons]

However, that will map to an array of arrays instead of an array of hashes. To fix that:

planets_with.merge!(planets_with) { |key, values| Hash[values] }
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Where do I get the non-matching planets back? select! discards them. –  Nathan Long Apr 17 '12 at 20:03
    
@NathanLong, apologies; I misunderstood your question. –  Matheus Moreira Apr 17 '12 at 20:20

Rolled my own

class Hash
  def reject_and_return!(&block)
    matches = {}
    self.each do |k, v|
      matches[k] = self.delete(k) if block.call(k, v)
    end
    matches
  end
end

Works as expected:

planets = {'Mars' => 2, 'Jupiter' => 63, 'Saturn' => 47}

few_moons = planets.reject_and_return! do |planet, moon_count|
  moon_count < 50
end

few_moons #=> {'Mars'  => 2, 'Saturn' => 47}
planets   #=> {'Jupiter' => 63}
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The Hash[] constructor will take the arrays back from partition and turn them into hashes the way you want. It's not a single line, but I think it's cleaner:

a, not_a = {a: 'b', c: 'd', e: 'f'}.partition{|k,v| k == :a} a=Hash[a] not_a = Hash[not_a}

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