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Hi I have an interactive graphing function. Because of some limitations, I have to delete the figure every time the user interacts with the graphic using:

$("button").click(function () {
     $("p").empty();
 });

However, then I want to regenerate the graphic by calling (in protovis):

drawHistogram(){
var w = 420
var h = 300
var vis = new pv.Panel()
.width(w)
.height(h)
.margin(20);
//add data into the visualization
vis.render();
}

in JQuery. However, now this graphic isn't surrounded by the <p> tags so when I click the button, nothing will happen in this iteration. How would I surround the drawHistogram() call with <p> tags? Thanks!

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4  
can you provide the code for drawHistogram()? –  Mathletics Apr 17 '12 at 20:07
    
Yeah, it's a little hard to decide the best way to do this without seeing how drawHistogram() works. –  Jake Apr 17 '12 at 20:16
    
How does the graphic get into the <p> tags in the first place, before you $.empty() them? –  Jake Apr 17 '12 at 20:26
    
Your title says <div> but your question says <p>. Which is it? And you can't wrap jQuery functions with html. –  jrummell Apr 17 '12 at 20:26

4 Answers 4

If drawHistogram() is a PHP function:

<?php
    function drawHistogram() {
?>

    <P>

<?php

    // Draw Histogram code goes here

?>

    </p>

<?php
    }
?>
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Whatever element the vis.render(); renders just access it and wrap it using jQuery http://api.jquery.com/wrap/

<div class="vis-rendered">
  <div class="inner">Vis Image</div>
</div>

$('.vis-rendered').wrap('<p />');

Result:

<p>
  <div class="vis-rendered">
    <div class="inner">Vis Image</div>
  </div>
</p>
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You can try using jQuery .wrap() to wrap the element inside a <p> element.

if the unwrapped .inner element looked like this to start:

<div class="container">
  <div class="inner">Hello</div>
  <div class="inner">Goodbye</div>
</div>

Then you use $('.class').wrap('<p>') on the rendered element:

$('.inner').wrap('<p class="new" />');

The wrapped results would look like:

<div class="container">
  <p class="new">
    <div class="inner">Hello</div>
  </p>
  <p class="new">
    <div class="inner">Goodbye</div>
  </p>
</div>
share|improve this answer

Why not have a container element and every time you call drawHistogram(), inside that method you wrap the result within a "<p>" element.

Here, see if this example will help.

http://jsfiddle.net/BP5hb/

Best,

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