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I am trying to create a Nuget package for a library that depends on ghostscript and therefore references gsdll32.dll - an unmanaged library. I can't just included that a standard dll reference. Where do I put this in the nuget directory structure?

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2 Answers

Response on the Nuget forum: http://nuget.codeplex.com/discussions/352689

pranavkm: The SQLCE package has a similar issue that we handle via PS scripts. Checkout out the scripts at https://bitbucket.org/davidebbo/nugetpackages/src/1cba18b864f7/SqlServerCompact/Tools.

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The above reference can work, but it actually modifies your post build event to push files over, which may not actually fix your issue if you have the situation we did.

The issue we were having was a dependent DLL could not be registered, but had to exist side by side with another DLL which needed to be registered by nuget so it needed to exist in the lib directory but not be registered.

The nuspec reference now allows you to specify which DLLs in the lib directory get explicitly registered in the visual studio project now, you simply need to add into your nuspec file in the metadata area an explicit references list (if this does not exist the default behavior of nuget is to attempt to register everything under lib).

Here is an example nuspec file of what I mean:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<package xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/packaging/2010/07/nuspec.xsd">
    <metadata>
        <id>SomePackageID</id>
        <version>1.0.1</version>
        <title>Some Package Title</title>
        <authors>Some Authors</authors>
        <requireLicenseAcceptance>false</requireLicenseAcceptance>
        <description>Blah blah blah.</description>
        <references>
            <reference file="ceTe.DynamicPDF.Rasterizer.20.x86.dll" />          
        </references>
    </metadata>
    <files>
        <file src="\\SomeNetworkLocation\ceTe.DynamicPDF.Rasterizer.20.x86.dll" target="lib\ceTe.DynamicPDF.Rasterizer.20.x86.dll" />
        <file src="\\SomeNetworkLocation\DPDFRast.x86.dll" target="lib\DPDFRast.x86.dll" />
    </files>
</package>

As you can see, ceTe.DynamicPDF.Rasterizer.20.x86.dll needs to be registered, but DPDFRast.x86.dll simply needs to exist in that directory to support the other DLL and won't be registered but through some dynamic referencing magic will ultimately be copied over into the destination bin directory anyway because visual studio sees that the first DLL is dependent upon the second.

Here is the original nuspec reference.

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