Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I defined a route for the Web Api as follows

 routes.MapHttpRoute(
                name: "SearchApi",
                routeTemplate: "api/search/{controller}-{seopath}",
                defaults: new { seopath = RouteParameter.Optional }
            );

            routes.MapHttpRoute(
                name: "DefaultApi",
                routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
                defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
            );

However, when I run it from visual studio and go to http://localhost:50356/api/search/jobs-in-Bangalore I get 404 error with the message "No type was found that matches the controller named 'jobs-in'."

In the book, Professional Asp.Net MVC 1.0, pg 207 {title}-{author} is given as a valid route url, so why is it interpreting "jobs-in" as a controller instead of "jobs" ?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Apparently the match is greedy. Why not define your route like:

routeTemplate: "api/search/{controller}/{seopath}"
share|improve this answer
    
well, we had a hacky way in the old webforms website where url's such as "site.com/jobs-in-bangalore" were mapped to a a particular page with certain query string parameters. e.g. "jobs-in-bangalore" would map to "search.aspx?City=Bangalore" These urls are present in search engine results so it would be great to just support the format. But it seems that cannot be possible in any way? –  sassyboy Apr 17 '12 at 20:48
    
If you want to maintain your existing SEO URIs, you can write a custom route contstraint (see stephenwalther.com/blog/archive/2008/08/07/… for examples) or you could utilize IIS' URL Rewrite (iis.net/download/urlrewrite). Personally, I would go with the custom constraint. –  DPeden Apr 17 '12 at 21:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.