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So I've seen a lot of examples, and done a lot of googling, and looked at examples on Stack Overflow... and I need help. I've got an Android application and I'm storing username and passwords on the device, and I need to encrypt them AES 256. From looking at examples, this is what I have so far:

public class Security {
Cipher ecipher;
Cipher dcipher;

// 8-byte Salt
byte[] salt = {
        (byte)0xA9, (byte)0x9B, (byte)0xC8, (byte)0x32,
        (byte)0x56, (byte)0x35, (byte)0xE3, (byte)0x03
};

// Iteration count
int iterationCount = 19;

public Security (String passPhrase) {
    try {
        // Create the key
        KeySpec keySpec = new PBEKeySpec(passPhrase.toCharArray(), salt, iterationCount);
        SecretKey key = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance(
                "PBEWithSHAAndAES").generateSecret(keySpec);
        ecipher = Cipher.getInstance(key.getAlgorithm());
        dcipher = Cipher.getInstance(key.getAlgorithm());

        // Prepare the parameter to the ciphers
        AlgorithmParameterSpec paramSpec = new PBEParameterSpec(salt, iterationCount);

        // Create the ciphers
        ecipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key, paramSpec);
        dcipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key, paramSpec);
    } catch (Exception e) { e.printStackTrace(); }
}

public String encrypt(String str) {
    try {
        // Encode the string into bytes using utf-8
        byte[] utf8 = str.getBytes("UTF8");

        // Encrypt
        byte[] enc = ecipher.doFinal(utf8);

        // Encode bytes to base64 to get a string
        return Base64.encodeToString(enc, Base64.DEFAULT);
    } catch (Exception e) { 
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
}

public String decrypt(String str) {
    try {
        // Decode base64 to get bytes
        byte[] dec = Base64.decode(str, Base64.DEFAULT);

        // Decrypt
        byte[] utf8 = dcipher.doFinal(dec);

        // Decode using utf-8
        return new String(utf8, "UTF8");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
}
}

I'm trying to make it password based, so a user will create an account the first time using the username and password needed to communicate back to the server, and create a PIN that will be used as the key for these credentials stored in the database.

What I'm mainly concerned about is does this look secure? I know a fixed salt is bad, how do I fix that?

I know there's been like a billion questions about this, but I want someone to just come out and say "THIS IS SECURE" or "THIS IS NOT SECURE, CHANGE THIS"

Thanks!


EDIT:

So this is the code I have so far, and it seems to be working... public class Security {

Cipher ecipher;
Cipher dcipher;
byte[] salt = new byte[8];
int iterationCount = 200;

 public Security (String passPhrase) {
    try {
        // generate a random salt
        SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
        random.nextBytes(salt);

        // Create the key
        KeySpec keySpec = new PBEKeySpec(passPhrase.toCharArray(), salt, iterationCount);
        SecretKey key = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance(
                "PBEWithSHA256And256BitAES-CBC-BC").generateSecret(keySpec);
        ecipher = Cipher.getInstance(key.getAlgorithm());
        dcipher = Cipher.getInstance(key.getAlgorithm());

        // Prepare the parameter to the ciphers
        AlgorithmParameterSpec paramSpec = new PBEParameterSpec(salt, iterationCount);

        // Create the ciphers
        ecipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key, paramSpec);
        dcipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key, paramSpec);
    } catch (Exception e) { e.printStackTrace(); }
}

public String encrypt(String str) {
    try {
        // Encode the string into bytes using utf-8
        byte[] utf8 = str.getBytes("UTF8");

        // Encrypt
        byte[] enc = ecipher.doFinal(utf8);

        // Encode bytes to base64 to get a string
        return Base64.encodeToString(enc, Base64.DEFAULT);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
}

public String decrypt(String str) {
    try {
        // Decode base64 to get bytes
        byte[] dec = Base64.decode(str, Base64.DEFAULT);

        // Decrypt
        byte[] utf8 = dcipher.doFinal(dec);

        // Decode using utf-8
        return new String(utf8, "UTF8");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
}

public int getIterationCount() {
    return iterationCount;
}

public String getSalt() {
    return Base64.encodeToString(salt, Base64.DEFAULT);
}
}

I used this code to test it:

 Security s = new Security(pinBox.getText().toString());
            String encrypted = s.encrypt(passwordBox.getText().toString());
            String decrypted = s.decrypt(encrypted);
            builder.setMessage("pin: " + pinBox.getText().toString() + "\n" +
                    "password: " + passwordBox.getText().toString() + "\n" +
                    "encrypted: " + encrypted + "\n" +
                    "decrypted: " + decrypted + "\n" +
                    "salt: " + s.getSalt());

So I don't need to worry about an initialization vector? Or specifically hardcode a Cipher algorithm?

Thanks again!

share|improve this question
    
Thanks mate for this help.. :) –  Noman Hamid Oct 31 '13 at 11:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: While the code below is correct, what you have is doing basically the same thing, with the IV derived from the password, so you don't have to store it separately.

Does your code work as expected? For the actual encryption/decryption you would want to use AES, most probably in CBC mode. Then you would need an IV, so it becomes something like this:

ecipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
byte[] iv = new byte[IV_LENGTH];
SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
random.nextBytes(iv);
ecipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, secret, new IvParameterSpec(iv));
byte[] enc = ecipher.doFinal(utf8);

Whether it is secure depends on what you are using this for. The purpose of the salt is to make it harder to brute force the passphrase: if it's random the attacker cannot use pre-generated passphrase tables (passphrase->key). If you are not too worried about this sort of attack, you might leave it fixed. If you decide to make it random, just store it with the encrypted data. Same with the IV.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm assuming I would encrypt the salt and iv before storing them with the encrypted username and password? If so, how would I decrypt? I wouldn't have the salt and iv to set up the decrypter, so maybe I'm misunderstanding? –  Josh Apr 18 '12 at 12:16
    
The salt is not itself a secret, it does not need to be encrypted. Nor is the IV. –  Nikolay Elenkov Apr 18 '12 at 12:20
    
Ok. That makes sense. Thank you for helping me to understand. I will edit my code, and post it back. I want to make sure I'm getting the best possible solution. Would you be able to explain the iteration count? Does it matter if it's random? I think I've read it if it's higher, the code takes longer to execute, but I'm assuming higher is better? I'm guessing it's something to effect of run the algorithm iteration_count times before returning a final value? –  Josh Apr 18 '12 at 12:32
    
The iteration count is just what the names implies: number of times the same operation is performed. The idea is that by making a single derivation slow, brute force attacks (10s of thousands of derivations) become impractical. Recommended values are usually about a (few) thousand, but that might be slow on mobile. Experiment and find a number that works for you without being prohibitively slow. Read the RFC for some details and justifications, it's fairly short: tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2898 –  Nikolay Elenkov Apr 18 '12 at 13:19
    
that link is very helpful. I'll make changes and test it and post back anything I'm encountering. I really appreciate your help –  Josh Apr 18 '12 at 13:50

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