Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having problems with one of my LINQ queries, so I made a simplified version of it in LINQPad to help me. Problem is, I don't understand why it's still not doing what I think it should...

var list = "1 2 3 4".Split();
var result = list.FirstOrDefault(x =>
                    x == "3"
                    && true);
result.Dump();

This gives back 3, just like one would assume.
However, when I run this:

var list = "1 2 3 4".Split();
var result = list.FirstOrDefault(x =>
                    x == "3"
                    && false ? false : true);

I get 1 back. The last line is the simplification of the actual code. Both examples should give true on the last line, which would return 3, but the query with the conditional operator is throwing a kink in there.

What am I missing?

share|improve this question
1  
+1: Upon initially reading the question, I furrowed my brow and wondered, "What am I missing? Why would you expect to get 1 out of the second example? x == "3" && false always evaluates to false..." Failing to think about operator precedence can cut both ways. –  Esoteric Screen Name Apr 17 '12 at 20:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your test expression is associating like this:

(x == "3" && false) ? false : true

instead of like this:

x == "3" && (false ? false : true)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "associating" –  BoltClock Apr 17 '12 at 20:24
    
Wow. This is CS101. I'm ashamed. Thank you. –  G_M Apr 17 '12 at 20:25
    
@G_M C-dialect 101. Operator precedence varies by language. –  user166390 Apr 17 '12 at 20:31
1  
@Mystere Man - I did. I had to wait 10 minutes before it would let me though! –  G_M Apr 17 '12 at 20:43

What you are seeing is due to operator precedence. A fix for you would be to wrap the condition in parens:

x == "3" && (false ? false : true)

&& has a higher precedence than ?:

share|improve this answer
1  
Presidency... ROTF –  Kendall Frey Apr 17 '12 at 20:24
    
@KendallFrey thanks, fixed -- autocorrect error :) –  payo Apr 17 '12 at 20:25

it counts as (x == "3" && false) ? false : true which is why you have a strange behavior.

share|improve this answer

I suspect your lambda evaluates to (x == 3 && false) ? false : true which will return the first element because the condition will always evaluate to false. Put parentheses for clearer code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.