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I have two different versions of the constructor for my "Policy" class. I can't seem to pass a Policy object by reference when using one of the constructors, and I don't understand why not.

Overloaded constructors:

Policy::Policy(int testing) { 
    initAge=160;    
    initState=1;    

    reset();        

    x[0]=4;
    x[1]=2;
    ub[0]=10;
    ub[1]=10;
    lb[0]=0;
    lb[1]=0;

}

Policy::Policy() {
    initAge=160;
    initState=1;

    reset();    

    x[FRQ]=4;
    x[BEG]=40*4;
    x[END]=75*4;
    for(int i=0; i<240; i++)
        x[2+i]=4.0;
    x[GS]=2;

    lb[0]=1;
    ub[0]=80;
    for(int i=1;i<3;i++) {
        lb[i]=160;
        ub[i]=400;
    }
    for(int i=3;i<243;i++) {
        lb[i]=1;
        ub[i]=16;
    }
    lb[243]=2;
    ub[243]=4;

} 

Here's my code that gives the error.

void sampleMIXD(Constraints& space, Policy& p);

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

//  Policy policy(1); // Works
    Policy policy(); // Does not work

    Constraints space(2);

    sampleMIXD(space, policy);

    return 0;
}

Error message:

'../main.cpp:64: error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of type 'Policy' from a temporary of type 'Policy (*)()'
../MIXD.h:12: error: in passing argument 2 of 'void sampleMIXD(Constraints&, Policy&)'

If instead of Policy policy(); I compile with Policy policy(1);, then the compiler doesn't complain. Please help! :)

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take off the parens. –  user195488 Apr 17 '12 at 20:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
Policy policy(); // Does not work

That's the most vexing parse. Try

Policy policy;

Basically, the compiler treats your variant as a declaration of a function taking nothing and returning policy. It's similar to

int rand();
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Ah-hah, yes, of course! I should have known that. But I didn't. Thanks. –  synaptik Apr 17 '12 at 20:56
    
The "most vexing parse" usually refers to something like Policy policy(Policy());. –  Charles Bailey Apr 17 '12 at 20:56
    
@CharlesBailey: Okay, so that's the second most vexing parse. The ambiguity is basically the same. –  jpalecek Apr 17 '12 at 20:58
    
Personally, I think that A a(); is a lot less "vexing" than A a(A()); which, to me, is a lot less obvious, –  Charles Bailey Apr 17 '12 at 21:20
    
@CharlesBailey: Then we have a sequence of more and more vexing parses A a();, A a(A());, A a(A(A())); etc. In this case, there can be no "most vexing" parse... –  jpalecek Apr 18 '12 at 16:47

Get rid of the () after the policy variable declaration. The compiler thinks this is a function declaration.

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As you can see from the error output, Policy policy() creates a function, which you then try to send to sampleMIXD. Construct it with Policy policy; instead (That is, omit the ()).

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