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Below, I inserted a code written by Ray Konopka (part of the Coderage presentation). I am planning to use it, however, I am not sure how to clean (on the fly) multiple objects. All my attempts were unsucesfull and rendered memory leak. Any thoughts are appreciated. Thanks,

  program stringlistDictionary;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
 Classes,
 SysUtils;

 type
   TPlayer = class
  public
   Name: string;
   Position: string;
   Hits: Integer;
   AtBats: Integer;
   constructor Create( Name, Position: string );
 end;


   constructor TPlayer.Create( Name, Position: string );
    begin
      inherited Create;
      Self.Name := Name;
      Self.Position := Position;
      Hits := 0;
      AtBats := 0;
    end;


    var
      Team: TStringList;
      Player, NewPlayer: TPlayer;
      I: Integer;


    function FindPlayer( const Name: string ): TPlayer;
    var
      Idx: Integer;
    begin
      Result := nil;
      if Team.Find( Name, Idx ) then
        Result := TPlayer( Team.Objects[ Idx ] );
    end;


    begin {== Main ==}

      Writeln( 'StringList Dictionary' );
      Writeln( '---------------------' );
      Writeln;

      Team := TStringList.Create;
      try
        NewPlayer := TPlayer.Create( 'Aramis Ramerez', 'Third Base' );
        NewPlayer.Hits := 120;
        NewPlayer.AtBats := 350;

        Team.AddObject( NewPlayer.Name, NewPlayer );

        NewPlayer := TPlayer.Create( 'Derrick Lee', 'First Base' );
        NewPlayer.Hits := 143;
        NewPlayer.AtBats := 329;

        Team.AddObject( NewPlayer.Name, NewPlayer );

        NewPlayer := TPlayer.Create( 'Ryan Theriot', 'Short Stop' );
        NewPlayer.Hits := 87;
        NewPlayer.AtBats := 203;

        Team.AddObject( NewPlayer.Name, NewPlayer );

        Player := FindPlayer( 'Derrick Lee' );
        if Player <> nil then
          Writeln( 'Player Found: ', Player.Name, ', ', Player.Position )
        else
          Writeln( 'Player not found.' );
        Writeln;

        Writeln( 'Active Roster' );
        Writeln( '-------------' );

        for I := 0 to Team.Count - 1 do
          Writeln( TPlayer( Team.Objects[ I ] ).Name, #9,
                   TPlayer( Team.Objects[ I ] ).Position );

        Readln;

      finally
        //!! Need to free the players.
        Team.Free;
      end;

    end.
share|improve this question
    
Other remarks: Self.Name etc. is not needed in the constructor. Why using a console app? Why not use a separate class for the list of players? –  Toon Krijthe Jun 19 '09 at 21:12
    
if that's the whole application you don't need to free any memory, since you are done with the application anyway –  BlackTigerX Jun 19 '09 at 21:13
    
@BlackTigerX: This looks like a simple illustration. You're right, for this case, but the real-world code he's trying to use this in is probably a lot more complex. –  Mason Wheeler Jun 19 '09 at 22:22
    
Gamecat, "Self.Name" is needed in the constructor. Otherwise, the object's Name field won't get set. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 19 '09 at 22:38
    
Do you have a link to the presentation? If that comment in the "finally" section was there in Konopka's code, then I wonder whether the omission was the point of the presentation. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 19 '09 at 22:44
show 2 more comments

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

With Delphi 2009, the TStringList constructor has an optional boolean parameter "OwnsObjects". If you set that to true, the objects are freed automatically.

Else you can do the following:

for i := Team.Count-1 downto 0 do begin
  Team.Objects.Free;
end;
Team.Free;

And by the way, public fields are discouraged. You beter use properties so you can control what access is possible to the fields. And you can add setter functions to validate the input.

type
  TPlayer = class
  private
    FName     : string;
    FPosition : string;
    FHits     : Integer;
    FAtBats   : Integer;
  public
    constructor Create(const AName, APosition: string );

    property Name: string read FName;
    property Position: string read FPosition;
    property Hits: Integer read FHits write FHits;
    property AtBats: Integer read FAtBats write FAtBats;
 end;
share|improve this answer
    
THANK YOU. I have tested your solution in my applications and all the objects were destroyed. I really appreciated. –  Greener Jun 20 '09 at 1:58
    
I want to correct this answer. Maybe D2009 introduced new constructor or what - yet the very OwnsObjects property existed at least from Delphi 4 (probably even from 16-bit Delphi 1) and can be turned on/off after creation easily. freepascal.org/docs-html/rtl/classes/… –  Arioch 'The Sep 5 '12 at 6:08
add comment

Kinda obvious, but still - you don't have to write 'for ... Free' code every time you want to clear TStringList objects. You can put it into a global function.

procedure FreeObjects(sl: TStringList);
var
  i: integer;
begin
  for i := 0 to sl.Count - 1 do 
    sl.Objects[i].Free;
end;

FreeObjects(Team);

Or you can put it into a TStringList helper.

TStringListHelper = class helper for TStringList
public
  procedure FreeObjects;
end;

procedure TStringListHelper.FreeObjects;
var
  i: integer;
begin
  for i := 0 to Count - 1 do 
    Objects[i].Free;
end;

Team.FreeObjects;
share|improve this answer
    
IIRC, class helpers can be broken easily without even a compiler warning. –  mjn Jun 20 '09 at 7:43
1  
Yes, class helpers are problematic - if you have multiple helpers for one class, the last one will always override all others. Still, they are useful. –  gabr Jun 20 '09 at 8:46
    
@Gabr: Thanks for the useful code example. I did not know that a class helper can used this way. –  Greener Jun 20 '09 at 13:47
    
I wouldn't use classhelpers if I had any other choice. In own code (that doesn't interact heavily with the VCL), it is easier to simply create a derivate and override destroy, like Gedean says below. –  Marco van de Voort Jun 23 '09 at 9:57
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just a clarification about gamecat answer: I don't know about delphi 2009 but usually the Objects property need an index, and you don't really need a reverse cycle, so:

for i := 0 to Team.Count-1 do
  Team.Objects[i].Free;
Team.Free;

or:

while Team.Count > 0 do
begin
  Team.Objects[0].Free;
  Team.Delete(0);
end;
Team.Free;
share|improve this answer
    
Is the "Team.Delete(0);" statement necessary? –  Argalatyr Jun 20 '09 at 2:17
    
The way he's got it written, yes. –  Mason Wheeler Jun 20 '09 at 2:22
    
@Mason: you're quite right - I don't usually do it that way. –  Argalatyr Jun 20 '09 at 4:40
    
It's not optimal, specially for large collections. The first code snop is better IMHO. –  Marco van de Voort Jun 23 '09 at 9:56
add comment

Using D7, I can just subclass TStingList

share|improve this answer
    
Hopefully you can do that in almost any object-oriented language...but thinking about the STL...maybe not –  jpfollenius Jun 22 '09 at 6:17
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