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Thank you all for helping me, I'm sharing the below code as it can provide 4 byte transaction/session ID that is thread safe, or at least I think it is :). it will provide very decent amount of unique IDs for 16 threads / 16 processes. the below is basic test for the function, p_no is the process number.

int get_id(int choice, unsigned int pid);
    int start_(int id);
    void *print_message_function( void *ptr );
    void *print_message_function2( void *ptr );

      unsigned int pid_arr[15][2];
    int p_no = 1;
    int main()
    {
         pthread_t thread1, thread2;
         char *message1 = "Thread 1";
         char *message2 = "Thread 2";    
         int  iret1, iret2;
    int s,f;
        for (s=0;s<15;s++)
        {
        for (f=0;f<2;f++)
        pid_arr[s][f]= 0;

        }

         iret1 = pthread_create( &thread1, NULL, print_message_function, (void*) message1);
         iret2 = pthread_create( &thread2, NULL, print_message_function2, (void*) message2);

         pthread_join( thread1, NULL);
         pthread_join( thread2, NULL); 
         exit(0);
    }

    void *print_message_function( void *ptr )
    {
    int one=0;

    get_id(1/*register*/,(unsigned int)pthread_self());
    while (1)
    {

    int ret = get_id(0,(unsigned int)pthread_self());
    printf("thread 1 = %u\n",ret);
    sleep(1);
    }

    }
    void *print_message_function2( void *ptr )
    {
    int one=0;

    get_id(1/*register*/,(unsigned int)pthread_self());

    while (1)
    {

    int ret = get_id(0,(unsigned int)pthread_self());
    printf("thread 2 = %u\n",ret);
    sleep(1);
    }

    }


    int get_id(int choice, unsigned int pid)
    {
    int x;


       if (choice==1) // thread registeration part 
        {
           for(x=0;x<15;x++)
        {
            if (pid_arr[x][0] == 0) 
            {
            pid_arr[x][0] = pid;     
           pid_arr[x][1] = ((p_no<<4) | x) << 24;   

           break;
            }
         }

        }

    int y;
           for(y=0;y<15;y++) // tranaction ID part 
        {
           if (pid_arr[y][0]==pid)  
            {

             if(pid_arr[y][1] >= ((((p_no<<4) | y) << 24) | 0xfffffd) )
            ((p_no<<4) | x) << 24; 
            else 
            pid_arr[y][1]++;
            return (unsigned int) pid_arr[y][1];
            break;
           }
        }

    }
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closed as not a real question by C. Ross, Praetorian, Michael Dorgan, Andrew Finnell, Graviton Apr 19 '12 at 2:37

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I'm sorry, what was your question? –  C. Ross Apr 17 '12 at 23:09
    
It's not a question actually, I'm just sharing what I've reached so far in providing unique sessions ID for any multi threaded session oriented application. –  Bag Dev Apr 17 '12 at 23:17
    
Perhaps would be better to post on codereview.stackexchange.com –  weston Apr 18 '12 at 12:58
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2 Answers 2

It isn't thread safe. For example, in the registration part, the following lines would be a problem eventually:

1:     if ( pid_arr[x][0] == 0 )
        {
2:        pid_arr[x][0] = pid;     

If thread1 executes line 1 and then a context switch occurs before it executes line 2, thread2 can run and execute line 1. At that point, both threads can end up "owning" the same position in the pid_arr array. Or, rather, the last one to execute line 2 will own that position and the other one will not own any position in the array.

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@BagDev: No - it would not fix it. The best thing is to just use synchronization constructs (mutex, semaphore, etc.) to ensure that you don't have race conditions. Lock free multithreading is very difficult. –  Mark Wilkins Apr 17 '12 at 23:34
    
That's right, Can that be safe if I use sleep at the registration part? or use mutex only on the registration part? –  Bag Dev Apr 17 '12 at 23:36
    
@BagDev: From a cursory inspection, I believe that would make it thread safe ... although a sleep would not necessarily be sufficient, you would need some kind of flag (event or mutex would be better) to indicate that the first thread was finished registering. A sleep by itself would not guarantee that the thread actually finished. –  Mark Wilkins Apr 17 '12 at 23:39
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Code that read/write file scope or external variables must be serialized, or it is not thread safe.

The sample provided is not thread-safe.

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