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I've seen a few different ways to get the next or previous model from a collection, but was wondering if anyone could offer some advice on the way I decided to implement it. My collection is ordered, but the id that i'm sorting on is not guaranteed to be sequential. It's only guaranteed to be unique. Assume that smaller ids are "older" entries to the collection and larger ids are "newer".

MyCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
  model: MyModel,
  initialize:function (){
    this.getElement = this._getElement(0);
  },
  comparator: function(model) {
    return model.get("id");
  },
  _getElement: function (index){
    var self = this;
    return function (what){
     if (what === "next"){
       if (index+1 >= self.length) return null;
       return self.at(++index);
     }
     if (what === "prev"){
       if (index-1 < 0 ) return null;
       return self.at(--index);
     }
     // what doesn't equal anything useful
     return null;
    };
  }
});

When using getElement, I do things like getElement("next") and getElement("prev") to ask for the next or previous model in my collection. What is returned from getElement is the actual model, not the index. I know about collection.indexOf, but I wanted a way to loop through a collection without first having a model to start from. Is this implementation harder than it needs to be?

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3 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I would do something like this. Keep in mind that there isn't any error handling currently so if you are currently at the first model in the collection and try to get the previous you will probably get an error.

MyCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
  model: MyModel,
  initialize:function (){
    this.bindAll(this);
    this.setElement(this.at(0));
  },
  comparator: function(model) {
    return model.get("id");
  },
  getElement: function() {
    return this.currentElement;
  },
  setElement: function(model) {
    this.currentElement = model;
  },
  next: function (){
    this.setElement(this.at(this.indexOf(this.getElement()) + 1));
    return this;
  },
  prev: function() {
    this.setElement(this.at(this.indexOf(this.getElement()) - 1));
    return this;
  }
});

To progress to the next model collection.next(). To progress to the next model and return it var m = collection.next().getElement();

To explain a little better how next/prev works.

// The current model
this.getElement();
// Index of the current model in the collection
this.indexOf(this.getElement())
// Get the model either one before or one after where the current model is in the collection
this.at(this.indexOf(this.getElement()) + 1)
// Set the new model as the current model
this.setElement(this.at(this.indexOf(this.getElement()) + 1));
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i like some of your ideas, particularly using this.at() in the initialize method. Your code though is pretty lengthy though. If no one else suggests anything better and/or more concise, you'll get the green check :-) My method is shorter and prevents falling off the end of the collection by returning null when you get to either end. –  Sneaky Wombat Apr 18 '12 at 16:52
    
You can shorten it by ditching the set/getElement functions and just accessing the currentElement value directly. –  abraham Apr 20 '12 at 3:03
4  
If using v0.9+ you'll need to have this.setElement(this.at(0)); that is currently in the initialize function called after creating the collection. This is because initialize gets called before the Collection creates the models. e.g.: var myCollection = new MyCollection(data); myCollection.setElement(this.at(0)); –  Denis Hoctor Jul 17 '12 at 1:43
1  
Like Denis says, this solution is no longer applicable in backbon 0.9+, you will need to set the starting element after initialize somehow. –  Graham Conzett Apr 9 '13 at 18:24
2  
Setting the starting element can be done by binding a init on the reset event. I did it like this: initialize: function(){ this.bind('reset', this.init, this); }, init: function(){ this.setElement(this.at(0)); }, –  Koen. May 2 '13 at 22:27
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I've done this slightly differently in that I'm adding the methods to the model rather than to the collection. That way, I can grab any model, and get the next one in the sequence.

next: function () {
    if (this.collection) {
        return this.collection.at(this.collection.indexOf(this) + 1);
    }
},
prev: function () {
    if (this.collection) {
        return this.collection.at(this.collection.indexOf(this) - 1);
    }
},
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While I like the approach, there are some issues with this in practice. 1. You need to add a custom "collection" property to your model that references the specific collection you want to work with. This assumes your model is only a member of a single collection, which may not be the case. Backbone's architecture keeps the model "in the dark", so to speak, about the collections and views that watch it to ensure loose coupling & flexibility. 2. these methods will throw errors if this.collection.indexOf(this) <= 0 || this.collection.indexOf(this) >= collection.size(). –  1nfiniti Jan 13 at 17:50
    
@mikeyUX I agree that only being able to belong to a single collection can be restrictive, that is the Backbone way. I personally think that there should be some List implementation in Backbone that is used simply for Model 'collections' but without all the server-side stuff, so you can do things like multiple collections more easily. Also, you could easily swap this around so it's a method on the collection that takes a model as an argument: collection.next(model); Finally, this doesn't cause errors in the scenarios you suggested - it returns undefined, which is expected! –  Tom Jan 15 at 9:28
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Bumping this old thread with a somewhat more generic solution:

Stuff to add to Collection.prototype

current: null,

initialize: function(){
    this.setCurrent(0);
    // whatever else you want to do here...
},

setCurrent: function(index){
    // ensure the requested index exists
    if ( index > -1 && index < this.size() )
        this.current = this.at(index);
    else 
        // handle error...
},

// unnecessary, but if you want sugar...
prev: function() {
    this.setCurrent(this.at(this.current) -1);
},
next: function() {
    this.setCurrent(this.at(this.current) +1);
}

you can then use the sugar methods to get the prev/next model like so...

collection.prev();
collection.next();
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